electric guitar style | electric guitar backing tracks

As Fender has it’s ‘other’ guitar with the Telecaster, so Gibson has it’s slightly less famous sibling for the Les Paul in its iconic SG style. These guitars are all-out rock and blues machines, and can be found in the hands of guitarists like Angus Young from AC/DC and Tony Iommi from Black Sabbath. The SG body is noticeably thinner than a Les Paul, with the double cutaways offering significantly better access to the higher frets. They score heavily on the looks front, being perhaps the most distinctive of the main body shapes, and are comfortable enough for long playing sessions.
Although they just released the Gibson 2016 line, Gibson’s first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish” and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup, named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar. The ES-150 achieved some popularity, but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
Electric guitars were originally designed by acoustic guitar makers and instrument manufacturers. Some of the earliest electric guitars adapted hollow-bodied acoustic instruments and used tungsten pickups. The first electrically amplified guitar was designed in 1931 by George Beauchamp, the general manager of the National Guitar Corporation, with Paul Barth, who was vice president.[3] The maple body prototype for the one-piece cast aluminium “frying pan” was built by Harry Watson, factory superintendent of the National Guitar Corporation.[3] Commercial production began in late summer of 1932 by the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (Electro-Patent-Instrument Company), in Los Angeles,[4][5] a partnership of Beauchamp, Adolph Rickenbacker (originally Rickenbacher), and Paul Barth.[6] In 1934, the company was renamed the Rickenbacker Electro Stringed Instrument Company. In that year Beauchamp applied for a United States patent for an Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument and the patent was issued in 1937.[7][8][9][10]
The strings fitted to the guitar also have an influence on tone. Rock musicians often[vague] prefer the lightest gauge of roundwound string, which is easier to bend, while jazz musicians go for heavier, flatwound strings, which have a rich, dark sound. Steel, nickel, and cobalt are common string materials, and each gives a slightly different tone color. Recent guitar designs may incorporate much more complex circuitry than described above; see Digital and synthesizer guitars, below.
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By the 1950’s, brands like Gibson and Fender were gaining notoriety thanks to the popularity of rock ‘n’ roll and its stars. Players like Dick Dale, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and Chet Atkins could all be found carving their own places in music history with the electric guitar, and by the early 60’s the instrument saw an extraordinary upsurge in popularity. Today, there are an endless amount of rock sub-genres, making no shortage of superbly crafted electric guitars from the world biggest brands, including Ibanez, Epiphone, and Danelectro, as well as Godin, Gretsch, Peavey and more. Whether you’re into black metal or folk rock, you can be sure that there’s an electric guitar that perfectly matches your own style and tastes, and it can easily be found right here, regardless of your skill level or budget.
Because of the Internet, storefront businesses are at Defcon One. It’s become nearly impossible to find that proverbial “diamond in the rough” specialty store. Only this diamond isn’t in the rough, it…’s in Worth, Illinois. Player’s has that vintage feel to it–a visual taste of rarity–that for the most part, doesn’t exist anymore; save for the few varied businesses that have withstood this tidal wave of internet commerce.
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the “stereo” effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1/4-inch plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
Bobby Jo is number one on this list. Every artist has unknowingly been influenced by him. Starting in the Mississippi Delta, Johnson’s life is rife with myths, and allegory. His deal with the devil and death are full of folklore and mysticism, and it only adds to his haunting voice and groundbreaking guitar playing. His songs are just a pure expression of emotion with no bars held. He led the groundwork for early blues to be filled in and worked upon by all the artists on this list. He also worked on breaking down social barriers. A black man in the early 20th century was not exactly the best place to be. But his music was to add interest by white musicians and help the civil movements of the sixties. Politically or musically, Robert Johnson is deserving of number one on this list.
On the forum there are thousands of people at all stages of playing that can offer advice on new beginner guitars. I have to admit that I play only top-end gear and don’t know the latest on all the new budget guitars, but on the forum there are people learning that can all give you advice based on personal experience, and there’s no substitute for that!
Of course the most talented and creative guitarist in the World. Guitarists like Slash can give stunts but cannot be such creative like Gilmour. I don’t know why people cannot understand and like silly stunts rather than real talent. A layman can listen to the guitar solos of Echoes, Dogs, Coming BAck to Life, Comfortably Numb, Time… Of Pink Floyd and they will easily know his vast talent. Gilmour must be ranked higher.
The problem is that most of those beginner guitar books just don’t have enough information to give you the tools that you need to advance past the curriculum in the book. They won’t tell you about some of the more important aspects of theory, and they generally won’t give you exercises or warm-ups that will help carry you into becoming an intermediate or advanced musician.
Playing the guitar well is not about strength but about control. As you watch any professional musician you will notice how they appear to effortlessly finesse their instrument. The easiest guitar to play is the one you are truly interested in.
Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
Zen guitar is not about scales and memorizing chords. Instead, it is a masterpiece of why to play guitar, helping you get through the times where learning guitar gets frustrating, and believe me, it will at some point get frustrating. But if you can get through that and push on, you’ll be rewarded with mastery of an instrument that will give you personal fulfillment and a lifetime hobby that brings achievement and satisfaction.
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Some “hybrid” electric guitars are equipped with additional microphone, piezoelectric, optical, or other types of transducers to approximate an acoustic instrument tone and broaden the sonic palette of the instrument.
Go ahead & call me a book worm or ban me & my books, but I can assure you that I have used all forms & methods of learning musical instruments including videos, and my favourite & fastest way of learning still remain books.
You are welcome Norman! We have a lot of Gibson in the comparison articles. The reason we did not include one in this list is because we do not want to see a newbie focusing more on keeping his guitar safe rather than learning fast 😀
The example we just played was a G power chord (also called G5) because the root note under the 1st finger is the note G. If we move the shape up the neck, we can play other chords. For instance, if you move it up two frets you get the chord A, because that is the root note you’ll find under your 1st finger.
Looking at the hardware and a good fixed bridge is sometimes more important than a tremolo-style bridge – especially if you are a beginner. Save the vibrato effects and epic divebombs for later on, when you’re a more confident player. A fixed bridge will also help keep your tuning in tact.
One of the most impressive guitars on this list when it comes to style is this C-1 SGR from Schecter – a respected brand in the world of rock and metal. With a design that’s heavily influenced by their premium C1 models, this affordable alternative features a solid basswood body that’s arched and contoured for great comfort, allowing unhindered access to the 24-fret maple neck. Some of the appointments – such as the custom 12th fret inlay and black chrome hardware – set this model apart from so many run-of-the-mill entry-level electric guitars. Electronics are hard to complain about, with two decent humbuckers and simple controls. Throw in a cool Schecter bag and you have one outstanding cheap guitar! More details? Check out the full review!
Number 1 is the index finger, 2 is the middle finger, 3 is the ring finger, and 4 is your pinky. You don’t use the thumb to fret, except in certain unusual circumstances. In those cases there would be a “T” inside the black dot.
Yeah. He may have to sit down when he plays, but he’ll have you on your feet when he does. BB’s creamy yet piercing tone, his unique vibrato and his absolute flawless ability to express his emotions through the guitar earn him a spot in the top ten. King’s years of fame haven’t gone to his head. He is still as humble as ever giving front row seat tickets to fans waiting in a cold parking lot just to have a glimpse of him. BB King can’t play chords. Nor does he sing and play at the same time. But he has worldwide recognition of his accomplishments as an artist. That’s a mark of a truly great guitarist.
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender’s Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.
The vertical lines on a chord chart represent the six strings of the guitar. The low E string (the thickest one) is on the left of the diagram, followed by the A, D, G, B and high E string, which is on the right of the diagram. The string names are sometimes noted at the bottom of the chord chart.
For new guitar players there are many ways to learn. You could pay for lessons, read books, watch videos, use DVDs and CDs, or do some combination of these methods. Guitar videos for beginners can be very helpful. These videos can teach you the correct technique and show you some easy songs to get started. A guitar tuner is another critical tool for guitar players of all levels. With a guitar tuner, you can ensure that you are playing on key. You may want to buy a guitar stand so you don’t have to put your guitar back in its case every time you play it, but still want to have a secure place to put it.

The greatest riff-writer ever. Billy Duffy is the greatest British guitarist ever, and if you don’t believe me, buy ‘Sonic Temple’. Duffy writes amazing riffs and solos, and although he’s got blinding speed, he knows how to use it with economy. – Floods
Gibson’s first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish”, and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped “bar” pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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A giant that successfully has reinvented himself over and over. Memory is short the present writes the rules so also in this rank: No guitar player has shaped modern ROCK music more than RB. Just listen!
The guitarist may also employ various methods for selecting notes and chords, including fingering, thumbing, the barre (a finger lying across many or all strings at a particular fret), and ‘bottleneck’ or steel-guitar slides, usually made of glass or metal. These left- and right-hand techniques may be intermixed in performance.
I have been trying to learn guitar for forever- but the sheer boredom of most teaching styles has turned me off- this is straight to the point- no “hot cross buns”- and perfect for an ADD brain like mine to scim and take what information I need to build a foundation and learn my own way.
This interactive package (complete with a book, an instructional CD, a wall chart poster, a guitar pick and three sheets of fretboard stickers) equips the novice with everything he or she needs–short of an electric guitar and an amplifier–to become competent to play in a band within three months. The course is divided into twelve weekly lessons. Each lesson outlines the objectives of the week ahead and concludes with one of twelve specially commissioned backing tracks over which the novice can use the newly learned techniques. The book concludes with tips how to get the right sound from a guitar, amplifier and effects, as well as tips on forming a band, playing live and recording. If you’ve ever wanted to play in the band instead of just watching it, now you can!
If you are serious about buying a guitar and learning how to play on it, you should be familiar with everything one can offer, from woods to pickups. Here’s a brief picture of some of the most important components that make up a guitar, and what you should look out for when browsing:
Playing guitar is an exercise in memorization. There’s really no way around it. You have to remember stuff, and the primary thing you have to remember is where notes are on the fretboard. Eventually, muscle and ear memory will kick in and the remembering will get easier, but for the first little while, every time you play guitar, it’s like a pop quiz. It’s not fun to memorize something by brute force, but it pays dividends. This book teaches you how to visualize the notes, which will lead quickly to remembering them. Once you know where the notes are, forming chords becomes easier, which leads to fluid playing in any position. At the very least, if you can identify your root notes, you can bail yourself out of trouble at any time. That skill for resolution serves you in improvisation and the random jams that will provide much of your growth.
26 Joe Satriani Joseph Satriani (born July 15, 1956) is an American instrumental rock guitarist and multi-instrumentalist. Early in his career, Satriani worked as a guitar instructor, with many of his former students achieving fame, such as Steve Vai, Larry LaLonde, Rick Hunolt, Kirk Hammett, Andy Timmons, Charlie …read more.
I grew up listening to Stevie Ray Vaughan. My oldest brother was a big fan of Stevie and he introduced me to the wonderful world of blues and rock. He did not play guitar himself but he loved listening to guitar players all the time.
Are you serious! Kirk Hammett must be in the TOP 5. Have you ever SAW HIM? He can play the guitar only with his left hand and you want talk about his sol… ! He made Metallica one of the best heavy metal bands OF THE WORLD… !
Guthrie Govan’s Creative Guitar is the end all be all for learning guitar. Buy it and you will gain an amazing insight into playing and philosophy behind it. It’s honestly great for everyone, from beginners to experts. Get it my friend.
Klaus, this is a great list and everyone will have a favorite left out here and there. Your list reminded me of some “forgotten” favorites and introduced me to some who deserve a listen. On a bummer side, I found out Gary Moore had passed away. I never got into his blues too much, but loved his solo work in the 80’s. Also great to see Frank Zappa acknowledged for his “off the wall” yet amazing guitar work. Maybe it’s time for a “top 200” list? J.R.
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