electric guitar reviews | electric guitar tuning app

Electric guitars are very popular, leading to the flooding of the market with cheap models under $300. This is not necessarily a bad thing however, as some of these less expensive guitars actually play fairly well and sound acceptable.
Notice how we’ve said ‘affordable’ instead of ‘cheap’? That’s because cheap guitars have connotations of being… well, pieces of junk. Cheap can mean ‘barely capable of producing a sound’, ‘plasticky components’ and ‘hardware that threatens to break at any given moment’. Not what anyone needs.
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So Fender, a company started in 1946, does electric. But as Mooney also pointed out to me, there’s been notable growth in acoustic-guitar sales of late, driven mainly by women taking up the instrument, inspired by artists such as Taylor Swift.
Not a bad article, but I’d go even cheaper. As a long time guitar and bass player (no longer gigging) and father, with guitars high and low cost in the house, I would advise parents to get a new Yamaha, Epi, or Squier (or a good used one of those) for a couple hundred $ or less and a decent Fender or Vox,, Spider, etc modeler amp for the same and see what happens. It has been hard to keep my kids interested, hurts the fingers, and my guitars have low action and play like butter. It isn’t like Rock Star! Reportedly 90% drop out in the first year, and by the time you are my age maybe 99% have quit! Lot of used stuff in the closets out there! So go to a decent store or a friend who plays and seek their help and advice. And get it set up by someone who knows what they are doing. My current favorite setting out and being played a lot is a 1996 Korean Squier Strat Deluxe, used for $99. So if they say spend over $400 total amp and guitar, ask someone else! They lose value real fast!
The electric guitar is a pivotal instrument in the history of modern music and is the central sound behind a diverse range of genres, such as rock, funk, and reggae. Electric guitars are well known for…
I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
Okay so the pictures of the guy in white sneakers are super dumb- but the book IS very helpful for a beginner; It comes with small stickers to place underneath the strings to practice fingering per different color stickers numbered 1-5 indicating 1st, second, third… fingering- you get the idea; I wrote on the stickers the letter of each note so I wouldn’t have to remember which colors indicated which notes; and the stickers come off clean with no residue; this is just an added bonus- b/c I initially bought this book over others- b/c it shows pictures of a players’ hand with fingers on the correct frets along with the actual chart; Personally, it is much easier for me to look at a picture of someone playing the note rather than a chart with dots.And as I said the stickers make it a breeze- I don’t have to look down every time I want to play a note to see if my fingers are in the right place. Also the book comes with a pic and a full length poster labeled “notes and scales” to refer to for all of the notes.I haven’t really read through the book- I’m a scimmer anyway- and the first chapter is all about positioning and tuning- which I already know; But if you are a visual learner- and have had trouble in the past- get this book to start with; It’s definitely learn at your own pace- and doesn’t remind me of a boring text book- other authors should be as innovative;
A floating or trapeze tailpiece (similar to a violin’s) fastens to the body at the base of the guitar. These appear on Rickenbackers, Gretsches, Epiphones, a wide variety of archtop guitars, particularly Jazz guitars, and the 1952 Gibson Les Paul.[16]
While the books above will pretty much translate to any style, I can’t help but be biased toward rock electric guitar, since that’s what I’ve played for half my life. Usually that means riffing with the help of a pick. Learning how to fingerpick will serve you well, far outstripping the relatively pedestrian world of flatpicking. Whether you use it to move on to fingerstyle guitar or integrate it into a hybrid technique, mastering the right hand in this finite way will make you a better player. In addition to the progressive book, you can download the song samples, which are enriched with the ability to slow them down, change keys, and set looping points to help you master parts one at at time.
Aside from the different shapes and musical styles each will be best suited to, there are other considerations which must be pondered. Each type of guitar will use different woods, have different pickup combinations, will physically and aesthetically ‘feel’ different, and you’ll learn that even two identical guitars, from the same range and same manufacturer, can offer a markedly different playing experience. Don’t worry about that too much yet though. Let’s start from the beginning.
In the 1960s, the tonal palette of the electric guitar was further modified by introducing effect units in its signal path, before the guitar amp, of which one of the earliest units was the fuzz pedal. Effects units come in several formats, the most common of which are the stompbox “pedal” and the rackmount unit. A stomp box (or pedal) is a small metal or plastic box containing the circuitry, which is placed on the floor in front of the musician and connected in line with the patch cord connected to the instrument. The box is typically controlled by one or more foot-pedal on-off switches and it typically contains only one or two effects. Pedals are smaller than rackmount effects and usually less expensive. “Guitar pedalboards” are used by musicians who use multiple stomp-boxes; these may be a DIY project made with plywood or a commercial stock or custom-made pedalboard.
Unless your goal is to play classical or acoustic music, most experts recommend starting with an electric guitar because it has lighter strings and can be easier to play than an acoustic. Guitar enthusiast Ben Newbold compares the pros and cons of acoustic and electric guitars[3] and explains how to care for your instrument[4] .
There are several string configurations available with electric guitars, including 4-string, 6-string, 7-string, and 12-string configurations. Although each configuration can make a slightly different sound, the differences are mostly down to personal preference. Nontraditional configurations include 5-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 18-string versions.
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Solid body guitars offer a fantastic platform for builders, allowing them to craft the wood into literally any shape. Naturally you’ll probably want to opt for a guitar with a single-cutaway Les Paul or Telecaster style shape, or a double-cutaway shape like a Stratocaster, Yamaha Pacifica, or Ibanez’s RG. However, the more extroverted beginner can check out some cool styles that always catch the attention, such as V or Z shaped guitars, or anything from Dean Guitars – especially if you want an eye-catching paint job!
The wood top of an acoustic guitar must vibrate in order to project the sound. This requires heavier gauge strings along with slightly firmer picking and fingering. The body of the acoustic guitar is much larger than the electric guitar, and usually has a thicker neck to support the tension of the heavier strings. However, some people find the immediate accessibility of an acoustic guitar resting on a stand appealing, making them more apt to pick it up and play more often.
The one-string guitar is also known as the Unitar. Although rare, the one-string guitar is sometimes heard, particularly in Delta blues, where improvised folk instruments were popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Eddie “One String” Jones had some regional success.[citation needed] Mississippi blues musician Lonnie Pitchford played a similar, homemade instrument. In a more contemporary style, Little Willie Joe, the inventor of the Unitar, had a rhythm and blues instrumental hit in the 1950s with “Twitchy”, recorded with the Rene Hall Orchestra.
6 Ritchie Blackmore Richard Hugh “Ritchie” Blackmore is an English guitarist and songwriter, best known for his work in the hard rock/metal bands Deep Purple and Rainbow. He was ranked number 16 on Guitar World’s “100 Greatest Metal Guitarists of All Time” in 2004, and number 50 in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the …read more.
Double-coil or “humbucker” pickups were invented as a way to reduce or counter the unwanted ambient hum sounds (known as 60-cycle hum). Humbuckers have two coils of opposite magnetic and electric polarity to produce a differential signal. Electromagnetic noise that hits both coils equally tries to drive the pickup signal toward positive on one coil and toward negative on the other, which cancels out the noise. The two coils are wired in phase, so their signal adds together. This high combined inductance of the two coils leads to the richer, “fatter” tone associated with humbucking pickups.
You can see in the image below it’s exactly the same as the numeric chord notation. The only difference is the fret numbers are now displayed vertically. Starting from the bottom to the top you will read x32010.
PLEASE NOTE – I do not know what guitar you should buy, so please don’t email me to ask. All I can offer is the advice above, but you might like to check out my recommended products for beginners too!
The strings fitted to the guitar also have an influence on tone. Rock musicians often[vague] prefer the lightest gauge of roundwound string, which is easier to bend, while jazz musicians go for heavier, flatwound strings, which have a rich, dark sound. Steel, nickel, and cobalt are common string materials, and each gives a slightly different tone color. Recent guitar designs may incorporate much more complex circuitry than described above; see Digital and synthesizer guitars, below.
The horizontal lines on the chart represent the metal frets on the neck of the guitar. The top line will generally be bolded or marked by a double line, which indicates the guitar’s nut. Fret numbers are sometimes noted to the left of the sixth string.
Go ahead & call me a book worm or ban me & my books, but I can assure you that I have used all forms & methods of learning musical instruments including videos, and my favourite & fastest way of learning still remain books.
The white circles along the top of the chord tell you that you should still be strumming those strings with no fingers pressed on them. If you see an X above a string that means you should try not to strum that string while playing the chord.
On the forum there are thousands of people at all stages of playing that can offer advice on new beginner guitars. I have to admit that I play only top-end gear and don’t know the latest on all the new budget guitars, but on the forum there are people learning that can all give you advice based on personal experience, and there’s no substitute for that!
There are even boards now for each specific instrument, so it’s easy to get the advice you need. They are not solely aimed at beginners, but there is lots of advice from experienced players and I’m sure you’ll get plenty of advice here from other GAS sufferers 🙂
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The fourth type of system employs string-through body anchoring. The strings pass over the bridge saddles, then through holes through the top of the guitar body to the back. The strings are typically anchored in place at the back of the guitar by metal ferrules. Many believe this design improves a guitar’s sustain and timbre. A few examples of string-through body guitars are the Fender Telecaster Thinline, the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, the B.C. Rich IT Warlock and Mockingbird, and the Schecter Omen 6 and 7 series.
The best way to use this type of book is to just take 15 minutes a day to work through a page or two at a time. You don’t have to find something that requires a lot of study or dedication on your part at this point. Your first priority should be finding a book that gets you thinking about theory as well as helping you develop coordination in both your fretting and strumming hand.
The best word to describe the California Series could be “extroverted.” At the event, Fender convened a panel to discuss the state of the guitar, moderated by Matt Sweeney (he of the recent Iggy Pop-Josh Homme band and YouTube’s delightful “Guitar Moves” fame) with Mooney, several music writers and executives, and artist-producer Doc Mckinney alongside Gina Gleason, who plays lead guitar for the band Baroness.
As musicians, we have a staggering amount of information available to us that can help us hone our craft. The hard part is deciding which resources are valuable and which resources aren’t. We’ve all ordered a book off of Amazon that we thought was going to take our playing to the next level only to find out that we could have gotten just as much out of a five minute Google search. Well, not all books are created equal, and you’ve probably not been looking at the right ones.
These days things are different. Thousands of guitars are available to you at the click of a button. You can find everything you need online, from any kind of guitar you could imagine, to amps, strings and even some top-rated guitar lessons for beginners.
If you’ve ever stepped foot into a music store, you’ve seen a Hal Leonard book. They’re iconic in the annals of guitar-learning lore. They’re not the hippest or the most accessible, but they nevertheless remain key fixtures. This compendium combines the three books of the method into one. Just about everything you need to know is in here somewhere, though it’s commonly said that an instructor is needed to parse the flow of information. Still, it’s a great reference and if it makes sense to you out of the gate, there’s the potential to learn a lot from this classic tome.
The lesson curriculum is not really my style, but all teachers vary. It focuses too soon on too much theory, and I believe in getting my students playing and having fun, thereby develop a love for the instrument quickly, rather than indulging in theoretical studies.
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Earlier this year, the company debuted a new line of effects pedals for electric players (another category where Fender has spent much time competing in the past), and this month, the company officially unveiled a new lineup of acoustic guitars.
This popular book teaches seven guitar techniques — alternate picking, string skipping, string bending, arpeggios, sweep picking, legato, and rhythm — one for each day of the week, with an emphasis on keeping it fun so that the learning process comes naturally.
MAB’s Speed Kills is essential if you want great picking technique. The Troy Grady channel on youtube is really good for any technique related questions about pretty much anything. There are some amazing Guthrie Govan lessons out there, and I reckon there was a Buckethead tapping lesson in a magazine somewhere.

In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine published a list called The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. This list included 100 guitarists whom the magazine editor David Fricke considered the best, with a brief introduction for each of them.[2] The first in this list is the American guitarist Jimi Hendrix introduced by Pete Townshend, guitarist for The Who, who was, in his turn, ranked at #50 in the list.
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In the 1970s, as effects pedals proliferated, their sounds were combined with tube amp distortion at lower, more controlled volumes by using power attenuators, such as Tom Scholz’s Power Soak, as well as re-amplified dummy loads, such as Eddie Van Halen’s use of dummy-load power resistor, post-power-tube effects, and a final solid-state amp driving the guitar speakers.
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Bring back teaching music theory and harmony to the public school system. I spent my money on music school only to learn what the so called best guitarist never knew how to do. Now what? Mr. Q public votes for the best on things they know nothing about.
‘Power’ Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana’s Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.
The thing I like about your list is that you make an impressive effort to include amazing guitarists from multiple genres. Usually these kind of lists say more about musical tastes of the person who is making the list instead of fairly objective evaluation of skill. I would add Christopher Parkening (classical) and Tommy Tedesco (anything). They said Tommy could play ANYTHING and do it better than anyone. I appreciate your saying the list is not complete. I would suggest removing the numbers and just list the names, as many of your commenters didn’t seem to read your opening qualifiers. LOL.
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