10 best electric guitar players | electric guitar action measurement

With similar specs and style to the 1952 original – but without the $10,000 price tag – this LP-100 from Epiphone demands attention. As highlighted in our full review, with a classic Les Paul shape, the body is crafted from solid mahogany with a maple top, and features a bolt-on mahogany neck, with rosewood fingerboard, and 22 medium-jumbo frets. The guitar has solid hardware, including a LockTone tune-o-matic bridge and StopBar tailpiece, and 14:1 die-cast machine heads. Good looks and hardware aside, this electric guitar sounds fantastic. This is thanks to the two humbuckers – a 700T at the bridge and 650R at the neck – which offer full, warm tones that adapt to the majority of styles. Perfect for a beginner, although by no means an entry-level guitar.
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This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.
With expiration of the Fender patent on the Stratocaster-style vibrato, various improvements on this type of internal, multi-spring vibrato system are now available. Floyd Rose introduced one of the first improvements on the vibrato system in many years when, in the late 1970s, he experimented with “locking” nuts and bridges that prevent the guitar from losing tuning, even under heavy vibrato bar use.
No Stephen Carpenter?? He has to be definitely in the top 150. May not be the most technically advanced but he has played so many different styles with the Deftones, and makes the most awesome and beautiful riffs that have been made!
This root note concept applies to many things on guitar. In fact, it applies to pretty much everything that does not use open strings. All scales and chords that don’t use open strings can just be moved up and down the neck. As long as you know which note is the root note, you will be able to find that chord or scale.
Some guitars have a fixed bridge (3.4). Others have a spring-loaded hinged bridge called a vibrato bar, tremolo bar, or whammy bar, which lets players bend notes or chords up or down in pitch or perform a vibrato embellishment. A plastic pickguard on some guitars protects the body from scratches or covers the control cavity, which holds most of the wiring. The degree to which the choice of woods and other materials in the solid-guitar body (3) affects the sonic character of the amplified signal is disputed. Many believe it is highly significant, while others think the difference between woods is subtle. In acoustic and archtop guitars, wood choices more clearly affect tone.
While it’s true you don’t need to read music to play guitar, you do want to learn to read chord charts. A chord chart is a visual representation of a guitar chord. Chord charts are a little like music-by-numbers—they tell you which finger goes where and on what string, so in case you come up against a chord you don’t know, you’ll be able to play it.

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28 Angus Young Angus McKinnon Young is an Australian guitarist of Scottish origin, best known as the co-founder, lead guitarist, songwriter and sole constant member of the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. When performing live he does his own version of Chuck Berry’s “duck walk” and has also spun on his side while …read more.
Another consideration, and something you’ll read a lot about, is the pickups, which give the guitar its voice. There are two kinds of pickup in this price range: the single-coil (which gives a bright, sparkly sound) and the humbucker (which is fuller, meatier and perfect for rock and metal). Both are as common as each other in this budget range, and a guitar with a mix of both will offer you the best versatility.
If you’re looking for a beginners axe with a little attitude, the Ibanez GRX20 should be one of the top choices on your list. The poplar body has a deep double-cutaway RG-style shape, with two finishes to choose from (Jewel Blue or Black Night). It also features a good quality bolt-on maple neck that’s fast enough for beginners, with a rosewood fretboard and 22 medium frets. Two Ibanez-designed Infinity humbuckers at the neck and bridge positions give this entry-level offering plenty of bite for distorted tones, but works just as well for softer, cleaner numbers. Considering how affordable the guitar is, the overall feel and sound you get is a big surprise – as we mention in the full GRX20 review.
Eight-string electric guitars are rare but not unused. One is played by Charlie Hunter, which was manufactured by Novax Guitars. The largest manufacturer of eight- to 14-string instruments is Warr Guitars. Their models are used by Trey Gunn (ex King Crimson), who has his own signature line from the company. Similarly, Mårten Hagström and Fredrik Thordendal of Meshuggah used 8-string guitars made by Nevborn Guitars and now guitars by Ibanez. Munky of the nu metal band KoRn is also known to use seven-string Ibanez guitars, and it is rumored that he is planning to release a K8 eight-string guitar similar to his K7 seven-string guitar. Another Ibanez player is Tosin Abasi, lead guitarist of the progressive metal band Animals as Leaders, who uses an Ibanez RG2228 to mix bright chords with very heavy low riffs on the seventh and eighth strings. Stephen Carpenter of Deftones also switched from a seven-string to an eight-string in 2008 and released his signature STEF B-8 with ESP Guitars. In 2008, Ibanez released the Ibanez RG2228-GK, which is the first mass-produced eight-string guitar. Jethro Tull’s first album uses a nine-string guitar. Bill Kelliher, guitarist for the heavy metal group Mastodon, worked with First Act on a custom mass-produced nine-string guitar.
The Fender Stratocaster is one of, if not the best known electric guitars in the world. Above all, it favours versatility, comfort and style, and is the first port of call for many budding players. Over the years, Stratocaster shaped guitars have been used by pretty much everyone from Jimi Hendrix to Eric Clapton, and its impact in the world of rock and blues cannot be underestimated. It features three ‘single coil’ pickups, which offer a range of different tones, and is hands-down one of the simplest guitars to pick up and play. Players of heavier music styles tend to overlook the Strat as its pickups aren’t geared towards driving amps with tonnes of gain, so if it’s a bona-fide metal machine you’re after you may want to look elsewhere, but if it’s a solid all-rounder with a range of different tones you’re after, you should definitely make a Strat your first port of call.
An excerpt: “No amount of tuning will suffice if your guitar is not intonated properly. Intonation at the nut is best left to the hands of your local repairman, but bridge intonation in most cases is a do-it-yourself job.”
Hollow: These electric guitars are composed of entirely hollow bodies, allowing them to be used both plugged-in and unplugged. They qualify as electric guitars because they are outfitted with electric pickups.
In describing the list to readers, Paul MacInnes from British newspaper The Guardian wrote, “Surprisingly enough for an American magazine, the top 10 is fair jam-packed with Yanks,” though he also noted three exceptions in the top 10.[3] The online magazine Blogcritics criticized the list for introducing some[which?] allegedly undeserving guitarists while forgetting some artists the writer considered perhaps more worthy, such as Johnny Marr, Al Di Meola, Phil Keaggy or John Petrucci.[4]
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This will be interesting, I’ve never met anyone who transferred from the violin to the guitar. I would imagine it makes things easier, since that’s a stringed instrument as well, albeit very different. I played trumpet before guitar, but that wasn’t much help to me obviously 🙂
In the 21st century, European avant garde composers like Richard Barrett, Fausto Romitelli, Peter Ablinger, Bernhard Lang, Claude Ledoux and Karlheinz Essl have used the electric guitar (together with extended playing techniques) in solo pieces or ensemble works. Probably the most ambitious and perhaps significant work to date is Ingwe (2003–2009) by Georges Lentz (written for Australian guitarist Zane Banks), a 60-minute work for solo electric guitar, exploring that composer’s existential struggles and taking the instrument into realms previously unknown in a concert music setting.
Electric guitars are physically somewhat easier to play, assuming they are properly adjusted, because they have a smaller body, thinner neck, and use lighter gauge strings. The pickups and amplifier do all the work of projecting the sound, so a lighter touch along with lighter strings makes it easier to play. An electric guitar needs to be plugged into an amplifier, which must be turned on before playing. For some, the extra effort that it takes to plug into an amplifier and turn it on may be enough to keep them from playing as often or taking advantage of a spontaneous moment to pick it up and play.
An electric guitar with a folding neck called the “Foldaxe” was designed and built for Chet Atkins by Roger C. Field.[20] Steinberger guitars developed a line of exotic, carbon fiber instruments without headstocks, with tuning done on the bridge instead.
With this new edition, they scrapped the DVD from the previous version, and introduced online video and audio clips, as a supplement to the book’s teachings. They didn’t take it overboard though, with just 85 videos and 95 audio tracks, but at least it’s a step in the right direction. You can’t learn music by just reading about it, you need audible tools.
No book is ever going to be a suitable replacement for an actual guitar teacher, but if you want a straight forward guide that will set out the foundations in a clear and easy to digest manner this book is great.
44 Eric Johnson Eric Johnson (born August 17, 1954) is an American guitarist, songwriter, and vocalist from Austin, Texas. Best known for his electric guitar skills, Johnson is also a highly proficient acoustic, lap steel, resonator, and bass guitarist as well as an accomplished pianist and vocalist.
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The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
In our most recent refresh of this budget breakdown we ditched two of the harder to find models and replaced them with a pair of modern classics – the timeless Squier Affinity Telecaster and the all-round beauty that is the Schecter C-1 SGR.
Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
Guitartricks.com is an online subscription service that has provided video guitar lessons for beginners and advanced players since 1998. The site has more than 11,000 video lessons with 600+ song tutorials, and more than 2 million members. With an unending appetite for improvement, via ongoing course production and licensing negotiations, the site continues to expand and progress. Learn more about the site with this Guitar Tricks Review.
If the book had been proofread better, I’d give it 5 stars. For example, there are places where the text has both a fret number and standard musical notation, and the fret number is wrong. The book refers you to play along with the instructional CD backing tracks, but it doesn’t tell you which track number to play. It’s easy enough to figure out what was meant, but a little more care would have been better.
The grid of six vertical and five horizontal lines represents the guitar fretboard. If you’re having trouble understanding the basic layout of the image above, hold your guitar in front of you so that the strings are facing you and the headstock is pointing up. The image of the chord chart represents this same view of your guitar, with strings running vertically and frets horizontally.
What Oscar Schmidt may lack in historic prestige, they certainly make up for in quality, and this OE20 – with excellent style, sound and craftsmanship – is nothing short of staggering for the price. With classic Les Paul styling, the mahogany body looks fantastic in any color. It’s light and comfortable to hold, and the maple set neck is a joy to play. It’s fitted with two passive humbuckers, at the neck and the bridge, which deliver a wide range of sound that would please advanced players as much as beginners. Two volume and two tone controls add versatility, while the tune-o-matic bridge with stopbar tailpiece ensure adequate tuning stability. The OE20 – which we have reviewed in full – is one of the first we would recommend to a beginner on a budget.
Brian should be much higher on this list! He is a Musical Genius! I never listened to guitarists until I heard Brian May play! Everything he does is PERFECTIOIN! Put him at the Top 5 where he belongs!
Number 1 is the index finger, 2 is the middle finger, 3 is the ring finger, and 4 is your pinky. You don’t use the thumb to fret, except in certain unusual circumstances. In those cases there would be a “T” inside the black dot.
Em is the first beginning guitar chord you should learn. It’s one of the most basic guitar chords not only because it’s easy, but because it’s used all the time in a lot of different songs. The small m after the E means minor. Think of minor as a flavor of sound.
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