harmony electric guitar vintage | electric guitar body

Unless your goal is to play classical or acoustic music, most experts recommend starting with an electric guitar because it has lighter strings and can be easier to play than an acoustic. Guitar enthusiast Ben Newbold compares the pros and cons of acoustic and electric guitars[3] and explains how to care for your instrument[4] .
Yngwie Malmsteen released his Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra in 1998, and Steve Vai released a double-live CD entitled Sound Theories, of his work with the Netherlands Metropole Orchestra in June 2007. The American composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca have written “symphonic” works for large ensembles of electric guitars, in some cases numbering up to 100 players, and the instrument is a core member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars (played by Mark Stewart). Still, like many electric and electronic instruments, the electric guitar remains primarily associated with rock and jazz music, rather than with classical compositions and performances.[32] R. Prasanna plays a style of Indian classical music (Carnatic music) on the electric guitar.
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Where are the brazilian guitar players? Don’t you know Kiko Loreiro, Rafael Bittencourt (both Angra), Eduardo Ardanuy (Dr. Sin), Robertinho do Recife, Hugo and Luis Mariutti (André Matos), Frank Solari? You know them and many others amazing guitar players in this website http://www.heavymetalbrasil.net/guitarristasdobrasil.html
Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. However, some features are present on most guitars. The photo below shows the different parts of an electric guitar. The headstock (1) contains the metal machine heads (1.1), which use a worm gear for tuning. The nut (1.4)—a thin fret-like strip of metal, plastic, graphite or bone—supports the strings at the headstock end of the instrument. The frets (2.3) are thin metal strips that stop the string at the correct pitch when the player pushes a string against the fingerboard. The truss rod (1.2) is a metal rod (usually adjustable) that counters the tension of the strings to keep the neck straight. Position markers (2.2) provide the player with a reference to the playing position on the fingerboard.[13]
Don’t forget to check the action. If it’s too high you will really struggle when it comes to barre chords and power chords later on. Make sure you have a play of it and make sure it feels comfortable for you.
I think for the general beginner an electric guitar is probably the best instrument, mainly because they are a little easier to play and so you will see results faster, which will inspire you to play more.
The cost of an electric guitar can range from under $100 to several thousands of dollars. There are a multitude of factors that contribute to the cost of electric guitars. The condition of a guitar is probably the most important of those factors. A guitar will not be worth much at all if it is unplayable and in need of serious repair. The age is another important part of determining the electric guitar cost. When the condition of the guitar is nearly perfect, the general rule is that guitar cost rises as the age of the guitar rises. This may not be intuitive, but there is a great demand for well-kept older guitars. The components of the guitar (hardware) make a difference in the guitar cost as well. Guitars with floating bridges (Floyd Rose for example) will usually be more expensive than the same model with a fixed bridge. The quality and quantity of the guitar’s pickups will influence the price. The “machinery” of the guitar includes its metal parts, like the bridge, tuners, and various plates. Machinery can be plated with different metals, altering the cost of the guitar. The construction of the instrument also has an effect on the price. Heavier and more sonically pleasant woods typically add to the cost while necks that are attached to the body in one-piece are often more expensive than those that are bolted on. The aesthetics of the electric guitar, mainly attributed to the paintjob and finish, also affect the guitar cost.
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In 2011, Rolling Stone updated the list, which this time was chosen by a panel of guitarists and other experts with the top 5 consisting of Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Keith Richards and Jeff Beck. Artists who had not been included in the previous list were added. Rory Gallagher, for example, was ranked in 57th place.[5]
19 Joe Bonamassa Joe Bonamassa is an American blues rock guitarist, singer and songwriter. When he was only 12 years old, Bonamassa opened for B.B. King. He was born 8th May 1977. He is known to be one of the greatest blues guitarists ever.
I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
Okay so the pictures of the guy in white sneakers are super dumb- but the book IS very helpful for a beginner; It comes with small stickers to place underneath the strings to practice fingering per different color stickers numbered 1-5 indicating 1st, second, third… fingering- you get the idea; I wrote on the stickers the letter of each note so I wouldn’t have to remember which colors indicated which notes; and the stickers come off clean with no residue; this is just an added bonus- b/c I initially bought this book over others- b/c it shows pictures of a players’ hand with fingers on the correct frets along with the actual chart; Personally, it is much easier for me to look at a picture of someone playing the note rather than a chart with dots.And as I said the stickers make it a breeze- I don’t have to look down every time I want to play a note to see if my fingers are in the right place. Also the book comes with a pic and a full length poster labeled “notes and scales” to refer to for all of the notes.I haven’t really read through the book- I’m a scimmer anyway- and the first chapter is all about positioning and tuning- which I already know; But if you are a visual learner- and have had trouble in the past- get this book to start with; It’s definitely learn at your own pace- and doesn’t remind me of a boring text book- other authors should be as innovative;
Don’t worry that by choosing one over the other, you have locked yourself into that type of guitar for the rest of your life. Our experience has been that many players who start with one kind of guitar will, in time, gravitate to the other. Motivation for playing an instrument changes over time, and will occur naturally as your skills develop and the desire to play and learn becomes internalized. You will most likely develop skills on both the electric and acoustic guitars and enjoy a lifetime of learning and playing a variety of musical styles.
Go ahead & call me a book worm or ban me & my books, but I can assure you that I have used all forms & methods of learning musical instruments including videos, and my favourite & fastest way of learning still remain books.
I have been trying to learn guitar for forever- but the sheer boredom of most teaching styles has turned me off- this is straight to the point- no “hot cross buns”- and perfect for an ADD brain like mine to scim and take what information I need to build a foundation and learn my own way.
Compared to an acoustic guitar, which has a hollow body, electric guitars make much less audible sound when their strings are plucked, so electric guitars are normally plugged into a guitar amplifier and speaker. When an electric guitar is played, string movement produces a signal by generating (i.e., inducing) a small electric current in the magnetic pickups, which are magnets wound with coils of very fine wire. The signal passes through the tone and volume circuits to the output jack, and through a cable to an amplifier.[17] The current induced is proportional to such factors as string density and the amount of movement over the pickups.
In recent decades, the most “notable classical and cross genre” guitarist was Paco de Lucía, one of the first flamenco guitarists to have successfully crossed over into other genres of music such as classical and jazz. Richard Chapman and Eric Clapton, authors of Guitar: Music, History, Players, describe de Lucía as a “titanic figure in the world of flamenco guitar”,[13] and Dennis Koster, author of Guitar Atlas, Flamenco, has referred to de Lucía as “one of history’s greatest guitarists.”.[14][15]
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Open-position: The following figure shows the most common open-position power chords — E5, A5, and D5. These chords are merely the two or three lowest notes of the simple open-position E, A, and D chords.
This is a great DVD, and Keith’s style is very laid back, and easy to listen to. You can’t help but like the guy, and once you start watching the DVD, you don’t want to stop. He is extremely knowledgable, and it is like having an instructor right there with you. The DVD begins with the very basics, and works up to some quite complicated playing, so there would be something in this for everyone, from complete beginners (like me) to those looking for more challenges with their playing. For the price, I don’t think you can go wrong.
On an electric guitar, the vibrations of the stings are picked up and amplified electronically. Typically, the body is solid (not hollow like an acoustic guitar), although there are some semi-hollow body electric guitars. A full hollow-body electric is basically an acoustic-electric hybrid with pickups. The Internet Guitar Database names the parts of an electric guitar[1] .
Electric guitars need an amplifier to be heard above a singing voice, although they make enough sound just for practice instrumentally. There are also a number of units (like the Line 6 Pod and similar) that can be plugged into your stereo, but this isn’t much use if you want to play in a band. I did the majority of my practice on an electric guitar without an amplifier, and I think this helps you work on your tone, because you have to draw the volume out of the instrument.
By the 1950’s, brands like Gibson and Fender were gaining notoriety thanks to the popularity of rock ‘n’ roll and its stars. Players like Dick Dale, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and Chet Atkins could all be found carving their own places in music history with the electric guitar, and by the early 60’s the instrument saw an extraordinary upsurge in popularity. Today, there are an endless amount of rock sub-genres, making no shortage of superbly crafted electric guitars from the world biggest brands, including Ibanez, Epiphone, and Danelectro, as well as Godin, Gretsch, Peavey and more. Whether you’re into black metal or folk rock, you can be sure that there’s an electric guitar that perfectly matches your own style and tastes, and it can easily be found right here, regardless of your skill level or budget.
Although it’s a minor issue when choosing your first guitar, the tone and sustain that the guitar can produce relies on the quality of the material it’s made from. The most used tonewoods in the budget range are basswood, poplar, alder, and paulownia, while more expensive guitars can be made from pine, mahogany, and swamp ash. This is just a rough rule though – these days you will find mahogany in budget guitars and basswood in premium models. They all have different tonal qualities – for example, mahogany typically offers a warmer sound, swamp ash is brighter, while basswood and alder are well-balanced.

The best word to describe the California Series could be “extroverted.” At the event, Fender convened a panel to discuss the state of the guitar, moderated by Matt Sweeney (he of the recent Iggy Pop-Josh Homme band and YouTube’s delightful “Guitar Moves” fame) with Mooney, several music writers and executives, and artist-producer Doc Mckinney alongside Gina Gleason, who plays lead guitar for the band Baroness.
6th PLACE?! some people should get brains and listen to afterlife! SO FAST PACED! I say he is an expert at chugging and all of that and in afterlife, his guitar can make cool screaming sounds and I call synyster gates fans “synners” and he’s got a great sense of humor and a beautiful voice!
Chords are the building blocks of music and it’s important to know them inside out. Cost free guitar apps like Uberchord app (get a free download here) are great for practicing and learning in a fun and easy way, but I’ll also get into some important details in this article to help take your learning to the next level.
I was lucky enough to see him play several times growing up in Austin, Texas. Unmatched in my opinion, not only for his ability to improvise at both fast and slow tempos, but also in his skill at blending with and ornamenting the improv of his fellow musicians.
If my guitar playing friends can keep an eye out for these guitars, I had them stolen from me , one is a Gibson Les Paul , has a stinger on the back on the head… stock & a champagne glass on the front of the headstock , the other is a green BC Rich Gunslinger , any help would be appreciated
‘Power’ Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana’s Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.
In the 21st century, European avant garde composers like Richard Barrett, Fausto Romitelli, Peter Ablinger, Bernhard Lang, Claude Ledoux and Karlheinz Essl have used the electric guitar (together with extended playing techniques) in solo pieces or ensemble works. Probably the most ambitious and perhaps significant work to date is Ingwe (2003–2009) by Georges Lentz (written for Australian guitarist Zane Banks), a 60-minute work for solo electric guitar, exploring that composer’s existential struggles and taking the instrument into realms previously unknown in a concert music setting.
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.[citation needed]
I am a guitar teacher of 15 years and a technical junkie, so I prefer to steer people towards online video lessons. I believe that with the multimedia technologies of the 21st century, beginner video lessons are the most efficient way of learning guitar from home, and are most advantageous from a pricing point of view as well. I’ll add some recommendations for video lessons after the book reviews, in case you want to see that side of learning guitar as well.
Fender is arguably the most successful electric-guitar brand on the planet. Its Stratocaster and Telecaster designs have been played by everyone from Jimi Hendrix to Lucinda Williams, in every imaginable musical genre. Much of the time, those guitars are plugged into Fender amplifiers.
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New to this chart is Squier’s affordable Affinity Jazzmaster, which marries the classic Jazzmaster/Jaguar body shape with superb playability and stripped-down electronics to deliver an ideal guitar for beginners. Sporting the ultra-accessible body shape (made of solid alder), the highlight is the 22-fret C-shaped maple neck which is a real joy to play. It looks great, with that vintage-inspired ’68 headstock, and sounds pretty good too – a little heavier than expected, thanks to the surprisingly hot humbuckers. The traditional switching system is gone, leaving behind simple beginner-friendly controls – master volume, tone and a three-way switch. It’s a breath of fresh air for beginners wanting something different – as we mention in the complete Squier Affinity Jazzmaster review [INSERT LINK to Full Review].
I really don’t think you should spend less than about £250 ($400) because you will end up with something hard to play, and you probably won’t enjoy playing! At the cheaper end, both Yamaha and Fender make very good budget acoustic guitars. Lately I have played a lot of cheap Yamahas that were good; they are mass-produced, but mass-produced well. 
If you’ve read our full reviewof the 50s Stratocaster, you’ll know that this Classic Vibe Stratocaster is an excellent prospect for any beginner who loves the good old days of rock n’ roll! Made by Squier, this 50s-inspired electric has huge vintage appeal, with a modern feel thanks to a trio of Alnico III single-coil pickups and a smooth, modern C-shaped maple neck (with 21 medium jumbo frets). The body is made from solid alder with all the classic Strat style you’d expect from a Fender subsidiary, with a real vintage look (especially in the Sherwood Green with matching headstock). As for the sound, the three single-coils give it authentic Strat tone – well balanced with great clarity and sustain. Affordable, but far from an entry-level model, this is one of the best Squiers around.
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2. Practice switching between different chords keeping a steady beat. Try not to stop, the goal is to learn to switch between the chords getting the best sound possible (without stopping). Fix any problems as you are strumming.
As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.
In Vietnam, electric guitars are often used as an instrument in cải lương music (traditional southern Vietnamese folk opera), sometimes as a substitute for certain traditional stringed instruments like the Đàn nguyệt (two-stringed lute) when they are not available. Electric guitars used in cải lương are played in finger vibrato (string bending), with no amplifiers or sound effects.
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.
The third-bridge guitar is an electric prepared guitar with an additional, third bridge. This can be a normal guitar with, for instance, a screwdriver placed under the strings, or it can be a custom-made instrument. Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth plays with a third bridge.
The world has evolved, and there are much better, easier, beginner friendly methods nowadays, which are much more suitable for learning music. After all, music is an audible art, you need to hear it. And seeing the teacher’s hands move along the guitar is nice as well 😉
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28 Angus Young Angus McKinnon Young is an Australian guitarist of Scottish origin, best known as the co-founder, lead guitarist, songwriter and sole constant member of the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. When performing live he does his own version of Chuck Berry’s “duck walk” and has also spun on his side while …read more.
The first thing you see on the left is an “x”. That means you “mute” or “not play” the Low E-string. Then you see a “3” on the A-string, which means 3rd fret on the A-string. Then 2nd fret on the D-string, the G-string is played open, 1st fret on the B-string and finally the high E-string is played open as well.
Popular music and rock groups often use the electric guitar in two roles: as a rhythm guitar, which plays the chord sequence or progression and riffs and sets the beat (as part of a rhythm section), and as a lead guitar, which is used to perform instrumental melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In a small group, such as a power trio, one guitarist switches between both roles. In larger rock and metal bands, there is often a rhythm guitarist and a lead guitarist.
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