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One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender’s Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.
Although it’s a minor issue when choosing your first guitar, the tone and sustain that the guitar can produce relies on the quality of the material it’s made from. The most used tonewoods in the budget range are basswood, poplar, alder, and paulownia, while more expensive guitars can be made from pine, mahogany, and swamp ash. This is just a rough rule though – these days you will find mahogany in budget guitars and basswood in premium models. They all have different tonal qualities – for example, mahogany typically offers a warmer sound, swamp ash is brighter, while basswood and alder are well-balanced.
He invented heavy metal with Black Sabbath. Pulling out songs with such heavy riffs and beautiful solos is really amazing. Guitar in is hands is like AK47. His best work can be found in songs like ‘war pigs’, ‘heaven and hell’, ‘iron man’, ‘Paranoid’, ‘Black Sabbath’…
FINALLY………A decenct list of great guitarists……Sick of seeing Brian May and Eddie Van Halen at the top of theses lists!!!! The Blues Musicians are the the masters but seem to get left off most lists because they are not very well known!!! Great list although bit concerned abour Duane Allmans position!!! Surely the greatest slide guitarist of all time??? Should be top ten…
Looking for a back-up axe on a budget? Just starting out? This is the page for you! We’ve tried and tested some of the most affordable guitars around, and have compiled a list of those that impressed us the most
As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.
Although a power chord consists of only two different notes that are always five steps apart, such as A–E or C–G, the actual chord that you play may involve more than two strings, because you may be doubling each of the notes that make up the power chord.
I know you state your list is in no particular order, and that’s fair. But everyone assumes you are making him the best of all time, which is plain silly. There were shredders before he was even born that would set a fretboard on fire – and not with lighter fluid, but with their fingers!
A basic electric guitar with amplifier and cord starts around $200-$400 for a beginner’s outfit; a better quality kit can run $500-$2,000, and high-end electric guitars are $2,000-$5,000 or more for the instrument alone.
The cost of an electric guitar can be greatly reduced if you are willing to take the time to look for a quality used guitar. Close inspection of a used guitar by an experienced guitarist can act as a safeguard against buying a “lemon”. Used guitars can be found just about anywhere instruments are sold (even retailers sell used guitars), or from any of the many people who have at least attempted the craft. If you want a warrantied, brand-new electric guitar then it is possible to find good quality at a low price. Local music retailers offer you hands on testing prior to purchase, but if you are confident in knowing your ideal guitar specs, you can take advantage of online guitar sources such as the retailer’s site, auction sites, classified ads, or directly from electric guitar manufacturers.
Why do all the Affordable guitars have skinny necks. I have big fingers and its hard for me not to touch other strings when i am holding one string and the kills the sound of the. What is the best affordable wide neck 2inch at the nut
“We’ve never really had the same commitment to pedals and acoustic guitars as we’ve had to electric guitars and amps,” Mooney told me, describing the new California range as a fork in the road that will redefine Fender’s product mission moving forward.
We know the guitar’s capabilities because of Jimi. We can agree that vocal chords allow for our emotions to be rightly known. I hope we may also agree that Jimi’s guitar was the closest thing on Earth in matching the level of emotional expression one makes with their word and voice.
Play a lot of different guitars before buying. Even if you don’t know how to play, hold it and see how it feels. Examine the construction and finish for any scratches, gaps, blemishes or other problems. Be sure you’re playing with the amplifier that will be sold with the guitar. GuitarsForBeginners.com outlines things to consider when buying a guitar[5] and Musician’sFriend.com offers an electric guitar buying guide[6] .
This interactive package (complete with a book, an instructional CD, a wall chart poster, a guitar pick and three sheets of fretboard stickers) equips the novice with everything he or she needs–short of an electric guitar and an amplifier–to become competent to play in a band within three months. The course is divided into twelve weekly lessons. Each lesson outlines the objectives of the week ahead and concludes with one of twelve specially commissioned backing tracks over which the novice can use the newly learned techniques. The book concludes with tips how to get the right sound from a guitar, amplifier and effects, as well as tips on forming a band, playing live and recording. If you’ve ever wanted to play in the band instead of just watching it, now you can!
The first thing you see on the left is an “x”. That means you “mute” or “not play” the Low E-string. Then you see a “3” on the A-string, which means 3rd fret on the A-string. Then 2nd fret on the D-string, the G-string is played open, 1st fret on the B-string and finally the high E-string is played open as well.
In our most recent refresh of this budget breakdown we ditched two of the harder to find models and replaced them with a pair of modern classics – the timeless Squier Affinity Telecaster and the all-round beauty that is the Schecter C-1 SGR.
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So assuming you’re a beginner, your first step should be looking into a book dedicated to exercises and theory. Use this book in tandem with regular lessons or online lessons (if that’s an option for you) as well as learning songs on your own time.
Looking to buy your first guitar? Congratulations – this is a date to remember! Learning the guitar is a life-changing experience, and opens you to a new range of possibilities. But before you can learn, you need a guitar on which to practice and perform.
We start this list with a true classic in the world of electric guitar: the Les Paul Standard. For beginners, this is as close to a Gibson Les Paul as you want to get – and the affordable price really allows you to. With authentic Les Paul single-cutaway style – in an array of traditional and modern colors – there’s a solid mahogany body with a maple top, a slim D-shaped set mahogany neck, with rosewood fretboard, and 22 medium jumbo frets. Lovely to hold and fun to play. The sound comes from two Alnico Classic humbuckers at the neck and bridge, which are excellent at handling both clean and overdriven tones, with the warmth and tone you’d expect from Epiphone. In all, an outstanding electric guitar for beginners, as we state in our full review.
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Pictured is a tremolo arm or vibrato tailpiece style bridge and tailpiece system, often called a whammy bar or trem. It uses a lever (“vibrato arm”) attached to the bridge that can temporarily slacken or tighten the strings to alter the pitch. A player can use this to create a vibrato or a portamento effect. Early vibrato systems were often unreliable and made the guitar go out of tune easily. They also had a limited pitch range. Later Fender designs were better, but Fender held the patent on these, so other companies used older designs for many years.
At Sam Ash, we maintain close relationships with the most prominent electric guitar brands to make sure that we always have the very best, latest selection of electric guitars in our inventory. We carry acclaimed electric guitar brands including Fender, Gibson, Paul Reed Smith, Ibanez, ESP, Gretsch, Dean, Epiphone, Yamaha, Schecter, and so much more! If you’re a discerning player or guitar aficionado looking to add a new guitar to your collection, be sure to check out all the fine, premium electric guitars featured in our exclusive Electric Guitars of Distinction collection.
Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches. Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars’ compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.
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An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitarist strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is sent to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker, which converts it into audible sound.
Materials for necks are selected for dimensional stability and rigidity, and some allege that they influence tone. Hardwoods are preferred, with maple, mahogany, and ash topping the list. The neck and fingerboard can be made from different materials; for example, a guitar may have a maple neck with a rosewood or ebony fingerboard. In the 1970s, designers began to use exotic man-made materials such as aircraft-grade aluminum, carbon fiber, and ebonol. Makers known for these unusual materials include John Veleno, Travis Bean, Geoff Gould, and Alembic.
I should know because I own one of these, a 10-year-old Epiphone Hummingbird based on famous Gibson dreadnought design. It’s the type of guitar that you want to sling over your should and take out for some enthusiastic busking. It feels weird to play it while sitting on the couch.

Firstly, we advise sticking with a brand name you can trust. We’ve established that there’s nothing particularly premium about the guitars on offer at $200, but by sticking with Fender, Ibanez, Yamaha, Epiphone, Oscar Schmidt and the others on this list, you at least guarantee a guitar from a renown guitar manufacturer with some history, instead of something thrown together by a company who don’t specialise in instruments.
An excerpt: “Scorned, laughed at, jeered, chided, and derided. The concept of the solidbody electric guitar was subject to such utter disdain in some corners that it’s almost hard to believe it ever came to be at all. The ridicule and mockery would have been enough to send a less self-confident inventor running for the hills. Given our more than 55 years of perspective, though, we know it just had to be; a world without the solidbody guitar? Moreover, without the Gibson Les Paul? Unthinkable …”
Unless your goal is to play classical or acoustic music, most experts recommend starting with an electric guitar because it has lighter strings and can be easier to play than an acoustic. Guitar enthusiast Ben Newbold compares the pros and cons of acoustic and electric guitars[3] and explains how to care for your instrument[4] .
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Looking at the hardware and a good fixed bridge is sometimes more important than a tremolo-style bridge – especially if you are a beginner. Save the vibrato effects and epic divebombs for later on, when you’re a more confident player. A fixed bridge will also help keep your tuning in tact.
Yamaha have a reputation for producing affordable, versatile and good-looking electric guitars for beginners, and the Pacifica 112V (as we talk about in detail here) certainly aims to please. The Pacifica series is targeted at beginners, although experienced players would enjoy this just as much. With a whole rainbow of colors to choose from, an edgy Strat look, and curves in all the right places, the 112V features a solid alder body, bolt-on maple neck, and rosewood fretboard with 22 frets. It’s voiced by three Yamaha-designed Alnico V pickups – a humbucker and two single-coils, for lots of versatility and tone. The guitar also features a five-way pickup selector switch, coil-tapping on the master tone control, and a vintage-style tremolo with whammy bar. A superb choice for any beginner!
As for necks, the majority of guitars will have either a maple or mahogany neck, with a rosewood, maple or ebony fretboard. Again, there’s no right or wrong, and a neck wood is never going to sway your decision. But you should choose something that feels smooth and comfortable to play. There are a variety of shapes and profiles, and what you go for will depend on personal preference and playing style. For example, a modern C-shaped neck is always a safe choice as the majority of guitarists will feel comfortable using it, while a thin U-shape is great for faster players (think punk rock and metal).
The vertical lines on a chord chart represent the six strings of the guitar. The low E string (the thickest one) is on the left of the diagram, followed by the A, D, G, B and high E string, which is on the right of the diagram. The string names are sometimes noted at the bottom of the chord chart.
A guitar SAVANT! (google it young bucks) Truly gifted by the creator…Not much to look at though…Dresses abit grungy…Gibson built him a signature guitar for some reason…Kill switch has got to be a fun button to play with…Love the elastic strap that bounces his axe…maybe the best freak in the game today…for sure is the best guitarist…fast or slow…
This black beauty from ESP’s LTD shows off true rock style and a very playable neck at a price that doesn’t break the bank. The EC-10 features a glossy black well-contoured single-cutaway body made from solid basswood. There’s a bolt-on thin U-shaped maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard, and 24 extra-jumbo frets, which makes fast playing and string bending a breeze. As we highlight in our full review, the EC-10 is voiced by two ESP-designed passive LH-100 humbuckers at the neck and bridge positions, which are loud enough to cope with rock and metal lead playing, although articulate and warm when playing without distortion. Hardware is kept simple, with a tune-o-matic style bridge and stopbar tailpiece, and a single master volume and tone control knob.
Second only to the Strat in electric guitar terms is the famous Les Paul shape. Introduced by Gibson in the 1950s, the Les Paul offers a slightly different playing experience on account of it usually being constructed from mahogany, which provides a warmer tone which rings out for longer. Les Pauls usually feature two humbucker pickups, which add extra girth and roundness to your tone and make them ideally suited to players looking for something a little bit heavier. Plenty of other manufacturers offer variations on the Les Paul theme, and there’s even a Gibson-affiliated range from Epiphone, so if it’s a Les Paul you’re after then there’s plenty to choose from.
Even if you are on a budget, it’s always worth looking in the higher price brackets and considering something a little more expensive, which will offer better sound quality (which is always encouraging), better build quality (usually more comfortable to hold and play), looks cooler (which will keep you motivated), and will last you longer – allowing you to grow with the guitar. It’s best to buy at the top end of what you can afford. For additional inspiration, make sure to check out this electric guitar list.
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