electric guitar strings | legacy electric guitar red

Hollow: These electric guitars are composed of entirely hollow bodies, allowing them to be used both plugged-in and unplugged. They qualify as electric guitars because they are outfitted with electric pickups.
Called the “California Series,” they aren’t going to be for everybody. The quick take here is that these are acoustics for electric players — and very much intended to deliver a visual punch when played live.
Try to get your 1st finger to lay softly on strings 3, 2 and 1. You don’t want those notes to sound; you just want to mute the strings. This is very important as it will sound really bad if you let them ring out.
The colors are bold, and while the designs of the guitars’ bodies aren’t radical, the necks are a bit of a departure and the headstocks could have been taken from a Stratocaster. (Fender has done this before — and there’s currently one acoustic, the Sonoran, in its range that evokes the look of the company’s electrics.)
With reunions and other get-togethers scheduled during the holiday season, most people want to look their best at this time of year. For some, that means filling in those wrinkles with a bit of botox, or having a nip and tuck down here and there. || Posted November 23 2013
Use of audio feedback to enhance sustain and change timbre. Feedback has become a striking characteristic of rock music, as electric guitar players such as Jeff Beck, Pete Townshend and Jimi Hendrix deliberately induced feedback by holding their guitars close to the amplifier. Lou Reed created his 1975 album Metal Machine Music entirely from loops of feedback played at various speeds. A good example of feedback can be heard on Jimi Hendrix’s performance of “Can You See Me?” at the Monterey Pop Festival. The entire guitar solo was created using amplifier feedback.[24]
Many of us learned listening to him and Dickey. There’s never been anyone like him since. He is unique and sorely missed by all of the folks for that era and anyone else that has listened to him play.
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There are a lot of great guitarists on the list. It is always distressing, however, to see lists which highlight only guitarists widely known in the Western world. The lack of representation from many traditions around the world is disappointing, but understandable. It would be nice if someone put together a list that was at least representative of world over sensibilities, and which didn’t rely so heavily on popularity as a measure of skill. Even so, I applaud the depth of this list, and hope someone takes up my challenge to expand the horizons of musicians that look for new experiences.
I am pleased to see some jazz and blues guys on a list. This is rare because most people only like what they are used to and most people have not been exposed to much of anything except the middle of the road. One name left off your list is Tommy Bolin, a truly underated player. Remember, there is no such thing as good or bad music, just what you like.
After some internet searches I’ve found some acoustic packs (with a strap and picks) for less than £100/$175, and you can be pretty sure that these are not going to play well. People just can’t make guitars that are easy to play at that price. If that is really your budget, then please spend it on a decent electric (and leave the amp for now).
Eight-string electric guitars are rare but not unused. One is played by Charlie Hunter, which was manufactured by Novax Guitars. The largest manufacturer of eight- to 14-string instruments is Warr Guitars. Their models are used by Trey Gunn (ex King Crimson), who has his own signature line from the company. Similarly, Mårten Hagström and Fredrik Thordendal of Meshuggah used 8-string guitars made by Nevborn Guitars and now guitars by Ibanez. Munky of the nu metal band KoRn is also known to use seven-string Ibanez guitars, and it is rumored that he is planning to release a K8 eight-string guitar similar to his K7 seven-string guitar. Another Ibanez player is Tosin Abasi, lead guitarist of the progressive metal band Animals as Leaders, who uses an Ibanez RG2228 to mix bright chords with very heavy low riffs on the seventh and eighth strings. Stephen Carpenter of Deftones also switched from a seven-string to an eight-string in 2008 and released his signature STEF B-8 with ESP Guitars. In 2008, Ibanez released the Ibanez RG2228-GK, which is the first mass-produced eight-string guitar. Jethro Tull’s first album uses a nine-string guitar. Bill Kelliher, guitarist for the heavy metal group Mastodon, worked with First Act on a custom mass-produced nine-string guitar.
That’s why it’s incredibly important that once you work through your first method book you should start seriously considering finding a teacher to further your education. A teacher can help give you the tools that you’ll need to continually advance on your instrument, which in turn will ensure that it will be a lifelong source of entertainment and enrichment.
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36 Dimebag Darrell Darrell Lance Abbott, also known as Diamond Darrell and Dimebag Darrell, was an American guitarist and songwriter best known as a founding member of two bands, Pantera and Damageplan, alongside his brother, Vinnie Paul. Abbott died in 2004 after he was shot by a mentally unstable fan.
Keith Richards on 10 and John Williams and Julian Bream on 74/75? That must be a kind of joke. Both, Williams and Bream, will easily knock-out 90 % of the Rock heroes, when it comes to guitar technique. Also some Jazz guitarists like John McLaughlin are much underrated. Musical skills are more important than fame regardless of the style a guitarist is playing.
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Fender’s Squier subsidiary is a name synonymous with great entry-level guitars, perfect for those taking their first steps on the instrument. And this Squier by Fender Affinity Stratocaster HSS is a staple of their range. With the iconic double-cutaway Strat shape, there’s a solid alder body, finished in a glossy array of equally eye-catching colors. The guitar features a bolt-on maple neck that’s comfortable to play, with a maple fretboard and 21 medium jumbo frets. The ‘HSS’ refers to the pickup combination, with a humbucker and two single-coils, which is a versatile arrangement for both clean and distorted playing, especially when coupled with two tone controls and a five-way pickup selector switch. An excellent price for a good brand, and perfect for newbies. Make sure to check out the full review of this guitar.
Slightly more specialist, the bigger-bodied semi acoustic style guitars appeal primarily to players looking for big, warm clean tones and lots of natural resonance from the body. Semi acoustics, so named because they usually feature a hollow body for extra sustain, fit that bill perfectly and are often seen in the hands of musicians from other genres like blues and indie too. Noel Gallagher is a famous user of these kind of guitars, however we’d again warn against players of heavier styles looking to a semi acoustic. Apply too much overdrive or distortion to one of these and you’ll be subjected to horrendous amounts of ‘feedback’, which is where a loop is created between the guitar and amp and creates a high pitch squeal which can be extremely hard to control.
What the hell? Jimmy Hendrix #1? Above Les Paul, above Buddy Guy who Hendrix worshiped. And what the hell with Angus Young above Mark Knopfler, really? Chet Atkins is way to far down the list and you left Roy Clark off the list completely, unbelievable. Wait, you left off Jose Feliciano and Carlos Montoya too? And the fact that you have that low talent bum Slash listed above anyone is beyond unforgivable. I cannot even write straight, I am in such amazing dismay about the patheticness of this list. Frankly almost all the jazz guitarists can outplay the rock guitarists. Jim Hall, Joe Pass, all better than Slash could be in his wettest dream. Where is John Lee Hooker? His sound was completely unique among blues guitarists. Sorry to take this a little too seriously, but as a guitarist of 30 years and a guitar aficionado I am in shock at the naivety of this list.
The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.
Electric acoustic guitars should not be confused with semi-acoustic guitars, which have pickups of the type found on solid-body electric guitars, or solid-body hybrid guitars with piezoelectric pickups.
We are your new best friend when it comes to guitars, gear, lessons and everything else that goes with the greatest musical instrument in the world! Choosing a guitar and learning how to play can be overwhelming.
Also note that electro-acoustics are not electric guitars. They are acoustic instruments with electronics fitted so that they can be amplified, but you would not normally need to plug them in to get a good sound out of them.
If you want to understand where you’re up to in your guitar journey you should take a look at our Guitar Map. It will show you what you ‘should’ know by now (and also what you need to learn next to move forward as a guitarist).
Obviously it’s difficult to have a list that caters to everyones personal taste… and it’s also difficult to tell on exactly what makes a ‘great’ guitarist (technical ability? songwriting prowess?) … but to have Kurt Cobain to appear higher up the list than Nuno, Dimebag, Hammett, Satriani and Vai…. I’m a little confused. Still, some great names in there. Good on ya bro 🙂
Venue: 5hrs with server and Tap bar4 course meal, desert table, lighting, cloth napkins and centerpiece all for $2000Cake and cake pops: $240Additional decorations for dessert table: balloons, wooden ornaments and frames $600Prizes for baby… [more]
An excerpt: “Scorned, laughed at, jeered, chided, and derided. The concept of the solidbody electric guitar was subject to such utter disdain in some corners that it’s almost hard to believe it ever came to be at all. The ridicule and mockery would have been enough to send a less self-confident inventor running for the hills. Given our more than 55 years of perspective, though, we know it just had to be; a world without the solidbody guitar? Moreover, without the Gibson Les Paul? Unthinkable …”

For children, the piano is excellent choice to begin on. It offers more instant gratification for those first few music lessons, it breaks up the music theory, and it still provides a foundation from which they can tackle any instrument later on – including guitar.
Playing the guitar well is not about strength but about control. As you watch any professional musician you will notice how they appear to effortlessly finesse their instrument. The easiest guitar to play is the one you are truly interested in.
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This interactive package (complete with a book, an instructional CD, a wall chart poster, a guitar pick and three sheets of fretboard stickers) equips the novice with everything he or she needs–short of an electric guitar and an amplifier–to become competent to play in a band within three months. The course is divided into twelve weekly lessons. Each lesson outlines the objectives of the week ahead and concludes with one of twelve specially commissioned backing tracks over which the novice can use the newly learned techniques. The book concludes with tips how to get the right sound from a guitar, amplifier and effects, as well as tips on forming a band, playing live and recording. If you’ve ever wanted to play in the band instead of just watching it, now you can!
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Electric guitar necks vary in composition and shape. The primary metric of guitar necks is the scale length, which is the vibrating length of the strings from nut to bridge. A typical Fender guitar uses a 25.5-inch scale length, while Gibson uses a 24.75-inch scale length in their Les Paul. While the scale length of the Les Paul is often described as 24.75 inches, it has varied through the years by as much as a half inch.[citation needed]
The cost of an electric guitar can range from under $100 to several thousands of dollars. There are a multitude of factors that contribute to the cost of electric guitars. The condition of a guitar is probably the most important of those factors. A guitar will not be worth much at all if it is unplayable and in need of serious repair. The age is another important part of determining the electric guitar cost. When the condition of the guitar is nearly perfect, the general rule is that guitar cost rises as the age of the guitar rises. This may not be intuitive, but there is a great demand for well-kept older guitars. The components of the guitar (hardware) make a difference in the guitar cost as well. Guitars with floating bridges (Floyd Rose for example) will usually be more expensive than the same model with a fixed bridge. The quality and quantity of the guitar’s pickups will influence the price. The “machinery” of the guitar includes its metal parts, like the bridge, tuners, and various plates. Machinery can be plated with different metals, altering the cost of the guitar. The construction of the instrument also has an effect on the price. Heavier and more sonically pleasant woods typically add to the cost while necks that are attached to the body in one-piece are often more expensive than those that are bolted on. The aesthetics of the electric guitar, mainly attributed to the paintjob and finish, also affect the guitar cost.
This black beauty from ESP’s LTD shows off true rock style and a very playable neck at a price that doesn’t break the bank. The EC-10 features a glossy black well-contoured single-cutaway body made from solid basswood. There’s a bolt-on thin U-shaped maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard, and 24 extra-jumbo frets, which makes fast playing and string bending a breeze. As we highlight in our full review, the EC-10 is voiced by two ESP-designed passive LH-100 humbuckers at the neck and bridge positions, which are loud enough to cope with rock and metal lead playing, although articulate and warm when playing without distortion. Hardware is kept simple, with a tune-o-matic style bridge and stopbar tailpiece, and a single master volume and tone control knob.
The “learn guitar books” (both acoustic and electric) are here to stay, since thousands of guitar lesson books are being sold everyday, so I thought I would buy, read and compare a couple of these books and see how they perform.
What are chords? Basically, it is a two or more notes that are combined together. When we think of chords it is basically combination of notes played simultaneously. What we are going to do is we are going to know how to read chords.
You should now know all the notes in between the “white” notes from your study of BC-152 • The Note Circle – Eventually, you should try and remember ALL the notes on the thickest two strings. You will use these time and time again, so they really need to be in your memory, not on the screen!
Frusciante may not come off as all that impressive but his technical skill and brilliant solos are unparalleled today. I emphasize today because I believe him to be one of if not the best guitarist of the last 20 or 30 years
Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.
He is one of the best modern guitarist, but is often overlooked due to Muse’s polarizing style. Look at songs like “Knights of Cydonia”, “Plug in Baby” (one of the best riffs of all time) and one of Muse’s newer songs “Reapers.” These songs showcase his guitar skills very well, among many other songs.
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book. It’s yet another Hal Leonard book (that guy really wanted you to learn to play), with the same audio perks as the guide above. This guide is perhaps a little over the head of most beginners, but if you grapple with it early, the rewards could be considerable. Fourteen scales across 96 pages means this isn’t an enormous volume of information to digest, so give it a whirl.
The hollow body electric guitar rose to prominence when Gibson introduced the ES-150 back in 1936. Fully hollow body electric guitars (sometimes referred to as “Jazz Box” guitars) tend to have arched tops and large, deep bodies that allow the sound to fully resonate to produce an incredible full-bodied voice with amazing projection and depth. Jazz players and blues players really love the sound fully hollow guitars deliver. While the classic, larger-bodied fully hollow electric guitars definitely still exist, there are also a substantial amount of thinline fully hollow body electric guitars that guitar players may find to be more comfortable. Guitar brands such as Gibson, Gretsch, Ibanez, D’Angelico, Guild, and Epiphone provide guitar players with a fantastic array of fully hollow body electric guitars.
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