electric guitar recording | electric guitar setup

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If my guitar playing friends can keep an eye out for these guitars, I had them stolen from me , one is a Gibson Les Paul , has a stinger on the back on the head… stock & a champagne glass on the front of the headstock , the other is a green BC Rich Gunslinger , any help would be appreciated
I’m sorry but I do not like Green Day, I may be the only one who thinks this, and get yelled at for saying this… But I truly believe they’re overplayed on classic rock AND new music stations. They play them on every station, for music, on this planet! I get it people like them and all, but really, “Brain stew” Is a very overplayed song.
As for necks, the majority of guitars will have either a maple or mahogany neck, with a rosewood, maple or ebony fretboard. Again, there’s no right or wrong, and a neck wood is never going to sway your decision. But you should choose something that feels smooth and comfortable to play. There are a variety of shapes and profiles, and what you go for will depend on personal preference and playing style. For example, a modern C-shaped neck is always a safe choice as the majority of guitarists will feel comfortable using it, while a thin U-shape is great for faster players (think punk rock and metal).
Great guitarists are everywhere in this world… The list will never end if we start to mention. In my country (Indonesia), we also have many good guitarists: Lianto Tjahjoputro, Balawan, Dewa Budjana and many others… China has Xue Fei Yang…. Perhaps, in Asia, the chance to be worldwide recognised is a bit smaller due to several factors.
Learning guitar with no source material to work with will require many different resources, overlapped to fill the blindspots of each. Most people take lessons, but you’ll be at the mercy and pace of your teacher, with little room for your own interpretation. These days, there are apps and online lessons like Yousician, Musicisum, ArtistWorks, and Fender Play, which have their advantages, certainly. They also come with monthly fees, though these will likely be cheaper than a live local instructor.
This tome, which claims to have taught more than a half-million people to play guitar, debuted in 1979. Refreshingly, it assumes you know nothing about guitar and starts at the very beginning. There’s no flowery prose, just simple, straightforward advice.
So with most beginners their introduction to their instrument comes from a book. Their parents get them a shiny new guitar on their birthday or for Christmas, and there’s generally an accompanying Mel Bay beginner’s guide. That’s really not a bad thing at all; guitar players all over the world have started just like that.
To conclude, you’ll need to have an idea of your favoured guitar’s appearance, how you want it to sound and what you’re willing to pay. Hopefully those three variables will have gone some way to whittling down the options into something resembling a shortlist. We’ll take a deeper look now at some of the more popular styles of guitars, along with giving an indication of the settings in which they’d excel and examples of both entry and, for context, top level models.
1 Jimi Hendrix Jimi Hendrix (born November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American rock guitarist, singer, and songwriter . Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated …read more.
As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.
Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches. Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars’ compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.
So to get the most from your book, it’s important that you respect the intent of the author in how you approach it. That doesn’t mean you have to work through parts of the book that are below your skill level, it just means that you should always work through the book in a linear fashion. If you need to skip to the middle of the book to find something that applies to you that’s fine, just work chapter by chapter (or exercise to exercise) from that point on. It will help you retain the information that you learn in the book if you work through it gradually as opposed to skipping through it.
An excerpt: “Like Coca-Cola, Levi’s, or Harley Davidson, Gibson has transcended mere brand-name status to become a presence in life. It seems like Gibson has just always been there; and for all practical musical purposes, that’s true.”
Following the death of Les Paul, TIME website presented their list of 10 greatest artists in electric guitar. As in Rolling Stone magazine’s list, Jimi Hendrix was chosen as the greatest guitarist followed by Slash from Guns ‘N’ Roses, B.B. King, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page,and Eric Clapton.[11] Gigwise.com, an online music magazine, also ranks Jimi Hendrix as the greatest guitarist ever, followed by Jimmy Page, B.B. King, Keith Richards and Kirk Hammett.[12]
A strong guide for those learning their way around an acoustic guitar, this book will teach you to play popular songs like “Angie,” “Barely Breathing,” “Behind Blue Eyes,” “Building a Mystery,” “Change the World,” “Dust in the Wind,” “Fast Car,” “Here Comes the Sun,” “Jack and Diane,” “Landslide,” “Leaving on a Jet Plane,” “Maggie May,” “More Than Words,” “Name,” “You’ve Got a Friend,” “Yesterday,” and others.
The solid-body electric guitar is made of solid wood, without functionally resonating air spaces. The first solid-body Spanish standard guitar was offered by Vivi-Tone no later than 1934. This model featured a guitar-shaped body of a single sheet of plywood affixed to a wood frame. Another early, substantially solid Spanish electric guitar, called the Electro Spanish, was marketed by the Rickenbacker guitar company in 1935 and made of Bakelite. By 1936, the Slingerland company introduced a wooden solid-body electric model, the Slingerland Songster 401 (and a lap steel counterpart, the Songster 400).

okay we have a problem here. How can John Mayer be ranked two places above Matt Bellamy? I seriously dont get it. By the way Matthew Bellamy is guitar god ( okay okay along with Slash , Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain etcetera etcetera but still)
The Telecaster is Fender’s ‘other’ well known guitar shape. Typically Teles are suited to a more twangy sound, so are perfect for country and indie playing. They feature two single coil pickups, with the pickup nearest the bridge offering ultimate clarity and punch while the neck pickup offers something more rounded and bass-y. Teles are usually strung through body too, i.e. the strings are inserted actually through the wood, which can improve sustain. The Tele is unique in that not a lot of manufacturers offer a Tele variation other than Fender, so if it’s something distinctive you’re looking for then this is a great guitar to make you stand out.
Gibson’s first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish”, and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped “bar” pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
We think the reason this book is so good is because of its readability. That is, it starts very slowly in theory, and Tom does an excellent job of explaining the constructs of music theory in simple and understandable terms. From there, the concepts are set up in such a way that is easy to follow and very thorough. Mr. Kolb did a great job of laying out the sequence of the topics to make them understandable to someone picking up a guide to music theory for the first time.
Entire contents Copyright © Musician’s Friend Inc. Musician’s Friend is a registered trademark of Musician’s Friend Inc. All Rights Reserved. Publisher does not accept liability for incorrect spelling, printing errors (including prices), incorrect manufacturer’s specifications or changes, or grammatical inaccuracies in any product included in the Musician’s Friend catalog or website. Prices subject to change without notice.
An excerpt: “No amount of tuning will suffice if your guitar is not intonated properly. Intonation at the nut is best left to the hands of your local repairman, but bridge intonation in most cases is a do-it-yourself job.”
If you want to understand where you’re up to in your guitar journey you should take a look at our Guitar Map. It will show you what you ‘should’ know by now (and also what you need to learn next to move forward as a guitarist).
With a super-low action (see page XX) you might have trouble muting the strings because they will require so little pressure to sound, but you must. It’s the downside of having such a low action. You’ll find barre chords easy, but it’s going to take a light touch and lots of practice to get those notes muted properly.
Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
I take all my guitars to get set up by Mike. He is knowledgeable, funny. Always has a good story. Treats you and your equipment like his own. Never go to Guitar Center for any kind of maintenance… on your musical equipment. Get your guitars set up by Player’s Guitars for a fraction of the price and quadruple the customer service. Support him and his business. See More
Always factor in the size of your instrument. If you are a young player – or are buying a guitar for a child – consider that small hands playing on a full-size guitar may be more difficult than if you had an electric guitar made for kids.
Specifically, the book includes exercises to focus on sweeping, alternate picking, string skipping, and bending in addition to arpeggios and legato. Keep in mind, this book builds on the skills you’ll learn and practice along the way. Having said that, intermediate players can jump a few chapters and still get a ton of value out of the guitar exercises in this book. In that way, it really can function as a choose-your-own-adventure type way to learn guitar that matches your current skill level.
Several magazines and websites have compiled what they intend as lists of the greatest guitarists—for example The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine, or 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time by Guitar World magazine.
If the book had been proofread better, I’d give it 5 stars. For example, there are places where the text has both a fret number and standard musical notation, and the fret number is wrong. The book refers you to play along with the instructional CD backing tracks, but it doesn’t tell you which track number to play. It’s easy enough to figure out what was meant, but a little more care would have been better.
No book is ever going to be a suitable replacement for an actual guitar teacher, but if you want a straight forward guide that will set out the foundations in a clear and easy to digest manner this book is great.
Movable: Movable power chords are simply the two or three lowest notes of the movable barre chords. Movable power chords are either E-based or A-based. The following figure shows the F5 and Bb5 power chords that you play at the first fret, but you can move these chords to any fret.
When deciding piano vs guitar lessons, it boils down to preference. These are all fairly minor considerations in the scheme of things, especially compared to other instruments. Do you want instant gratification on the piano with all your keys laid out in front of you like a map of music? Or are you willing to work a little harder to memorise the fretboard quickly so you shred on electric guitar? Both piano and guitar are equally good at providing the essential fundamentals of music that other instruments like drums or voice don’t offer. They are both excellent beginner instruments that offer different paths to the same goal – to enjoy playing music and perhaps even become a professional musician someday.
After reading through Teach Yourself to Play Guitar, my opinion is that if you are giving a guitar as a gift to someone, this might be an OK book to accompany that. If you wanted to spend a bit more, or are looking for a book for yourself, I would go with the 2nd book reviewed below, the Guitar for Dummies book. It has online video and audio demos, and hearing what you should be playing helps when learning music… 😉
The > symbol is called an accent. It tells you to play those notes a little louder than the others. This forms a rhythmic pattern that gives a song a certain flavor, such as a Latin flavor, a Bo Diddley flavor, a polka flavor, or even a tutti-frutti flavor.
Guitarists like satriani and vai kneel before the feet of Malmsteen and his awsome power over the guitar.. just TRY and match his fretting speed and precision.. you’ll be trying for the rest of your life.
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4 Replies to “electric guitar recording | electric guitar setup”

  1. Keith Richards on 10 and John Williams and Julian Bream on 74/75? That must be a kind of joke. Both, Williams and Bream, will easily knock-out 90 % of the Rock heroes, when it comes to guitar technique. Also some Jazz guitarists like John McLaughlin are much underrated. Musical skills are more important than fame regardless of the style a guitarist is playing.
    This is an amazing list but i think at this point in his career brian haner jr.(synyster gates) from avenged sevenfold should be on there. Not is he only an amazing shredding guitarist for the band but hes super creative along with the whole band. They all get credit for everything its not just one guy in there obviously but as far as guitar goes hes an absolute beast he can play anything from shedding metal solos and riffs to laid back country and jazz and has been around long enough to have deserve it. Same with jacky vincent from falling in reverse. His playing skill is amazing. Bands like that get over looked for the talent tho. But with music with no prejudice, hes an absolute player too.
    What the hell? Jimmy Hendrix #1? Above Les Paul, above Buddy Guy who Hendrix worshiped. And what the hell with Angus Young above Mark Knopfler, really? Chet Atkins is way to far down the list and you left Roy Clark off the list completely, unbelievable. Wait, you left off Jose Feliciano and Carlos Montoya too? And the fact that you have that low talent bum Slash listed above anyone is beyond unforgivable. I cannot even write straight, I am in such amazing dismay about the patheticness of this list. Frankly almost all the jazz guitarists can outplay the rock guitarists. Jim Hall, Joe Pass, all better than Slash could be in his wettest dream. Where is John Lee Hooker? His sound was completely unique among blues guitarists. Sorry to take this a little too seriously, but as a guitarist of 30 years and a guitar aficionado I am in shock at the naivety of this list.
    12 Carlos Santana Carlos Santana audio is a Mexican and American musician who first became famous in the late 1960s and early 1970s with his band, Santana, which pioneered a fusion of rock and Latin American music.
    As musicians, we have a staggering amount of information available to us that can help us hone our craft. The hard part is deciding which resources are valuable and which resources aren’t. We’ve all ordered a book off of Amazon that we thought was going to take our playing to the next level only to find out that we could have gotten just as much out of a five minute Google search. Well, not all books are created equal, and you’ve probably not been looking at the right ones.
    Here’s how great Jeff Beck is: When Eric Clapton left the Yardbirds, Beck replaced him, and nobody missed Clapton. Later, when Beck left the Yardbirds, he was replaced by Jimmy Page, and everybody wanted Beck to return to the band.
    This popular book teaches seven guitar techniques — alternate picking, string skipping, string bending, arpeggios, sweep picking, legato, and rhythm — one for each day of the week, with an emphasis on keeping it fun so that the learning process comes naturally.
    Another consideration, and something you’ll read a lot about, is the pickups, which give the guitar its voice. There are two kinds of pickup in this price range: the single-coil (which gives a bright, sparkly sound) and the humbucker (which is fuller, meatier and perfect for rock and metal). Both are as common as each other in this budget range, and a guitar with a mix of both will offer you the best versatility.

  2. I want to learn jazz guitar, and I’m an absolute beginner. Is there a beginner book for jazz guitar? Every jazz guitar book I’ve found already assumes I’m an intermediate-level player or better. Thank you.
    It is possible to make power chords on other string groups too, but in normal playing you will only use root 6 and root 5 because they sound deep and powerful. The others are a lot less common and don’t tend to sound as good.
    7 Yngwie Malmsteen Yngwie Johan Malmsteen is a Swedish guitarist, songwriter and bandleader who was born on June 30th, 1963, in Stockholm, Sweden. He was known for his neoclassical metal playing style back in the 1980s.
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    Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
    Country: Vince Gill and Brent Mason. Mason can play almost anything though, he is an incredible session player. Look for Mason’s song “Hot Wired” to hear his hot lickes. Gill has his own unique and tasty telecaster style. He just doesn’t generally be flashy on his own albums but Clapton has had him at the Crossroads festival so check that out.
    This tome, which claims to have taught more than a half-million people to play guitar, debuted in 1979. Refreshingly, it assumes you know nothing about guitar and starts at the very beginning. There’s no flowery prose, just simple, straightforward advice.

  3. If you are a beginner then you probably don’t know what a ‘floating tremolo’ is. Have a look at Floyd Rose, who made the first models. If you are looking at a guitar that has little tuners on the bridge, then it’s probably a floating tremolo. For a beginner they are a total pain in the butt. They are very hard to tune and a real pain to change strings. The cheaper ones go out of tune a lot too. If you know why you want one, then fine, but locking tremolos on budget instruments are usually rubbish, so stay clear of those for now!
    Beginner’s Guide to Electric Guitar is all you need to start playing electric guitar. With an easy-to-understand and down-to-earth tone, this book gets to the important stuff first and doesn’t bog you down with all the details. Learn all about the different types of electric guitars, amplifiers, and effects, and learn how to play like Led Zeppelin, The White Stripes, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Green Day, Metallica, Nirvana, Rage Against the Machine, Jimi Hendrix, AC/DC, Alice in Chains, and more. To keep things simple, the music examples are written in TAB only and are designed to get you playing quickly—from riffs on a single string to power chords, pentatonic scales, and tunes in drop-D tuning. The accompanying CD features a full band to play along with.
    This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
    Woods typically used in solid-body electric guitars include alder (brighter, but well rounded), swamp ash (similar to alder, but with more pronounced highs and lows), mahogany (dark, bassy, warm), poplar (similar to alder), and basswood (very neutral).[14] Maple, a very bright tonewood,[14] is also a popular body wood, but is very heavy. For this reason it is often placed as a “cap” on a guitar made primarily of another wood. Cheaper guitars are often made of cheaper woods, such as plywood, pine or agathis—not true hardwoods—which can affect durability and tone. Though most guitars are made of wood, any material may be used. Materials such as plastic, metal, and even cardboard have been used in some instruments.
    Specifically, the book includes exercises to focus on sweeping, alternate picking, string skipping, and bending in addition to arpeggios and legato. Keep in mind, this book builds on the skills you’ll learn and practice along the way. Having said that, intermediate players can jump a few chapters and still get a ton of value out of the guitar exercises in this book. In that way, it really can function as a choose-your-own-adventure type way to learn guitar that matches your current skill level.
    Firstly theres no specific book for learning to play the electric guitar, its just a series of books to learn the guitar. My recommendation to you, learn to play on the acoustic guitar, then playing in the electric will be a peice of cake.
    These days things are different. Thousands of guitars are available to you at the click of a button. You can find everything you need online, from any kind of guitar you could imagine, to amps, strings and even some top-rated guitar lessons for beginners.
    This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.

  4. On any given day, you can walk into Norm’s and see some of your favorite musicians and artists rocking out. Norm’s offers lessons, repairs, trade-ins, and written appraisals. Although Norm’s vintage guitars are the main attraction, he also carries an impressive collection of basses, amps, accessories, and clothing. You can purchase Norm’s popular Lucky Brand shirt that appeared in the hit feature film Forgetting Sarah Marshall or the infamous Norman’s Rare Guitars shirt that Nigel wears in the classic rock comedy Spinal Tap.
    So unless you live somewhere where it gets REALLY hot or REALLY cold, then you’re probably be ok if you use your head. Leaving an acoustic guitar in the hot sun for a whole day will probably ruin it, leaving it out in the snow might not be too good either!
    In describing the list to readers, Paul MacInnes from British newspaper The Guardian wrote, “Surprisingly enough for an American magazine, the top 10 is fair jam-packed with Yanks,” though he also noted three exceptions in the top 10.[3] The online magazine Blogcritics criticized the list for introducing some[which?] allegedly undeserving guitarists while forgetting some artists the writer considered perhaps more worthy, such as Johnny Marr, Al Di Meola, Phil Keaggy or John Petrucci.[4]
    Thank you for writing this article, now I have all the time I need in buying my first electric guitar. I’ve been playing acoustic for like 10 years. I think this is the right time to upgrade my skills.
    Very cheap acoustics are usually not such a great idea. Often their sound quality is poor and they are hard to play. I often see students selling them after a six-month struggle (if they managed to stick with it that long!). So if your budget is very tight, I would not get an acoustic. You may think you save a little because you don’t need to buy an amplifier as well, but as I said before you don’t have to use an amplifier to practise anyway.
    Klaus its pleasing to see that you’ve included Rory Gallagher, he quite frequently gets ignored because he shunned commercialism to stay true to guitar playing. Admittedly I’m biased, Rory was related to me but I had the pleasure to meet and talk to him a few times and his down to earth personality was a credit.
    Some people like to play the two notes on 5th and 4th strings with a small barre with the 3rd finger. It’s O.K. to do that, but I think using two fingers gives you a better finger position on the notes; you’ll get a better sound that way, it makes it easier to change chords most of the time and easier to get all the thin strings muted. I strongly advise to learn it this way, and then if you still prefer to use the little barre you have the option of choosing whichever one works best in any situation!

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