electric guitar gig bags | easy electric guitar songs for beginners

Popular music and rock groups often use the electric guitar in two roles: as a rhythm guitar, which plays the chord sequence or progression and riffs and sets the beat (as part of a rhythm section), and as a lead guitar, which is used to perform instrumental melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In a small group, such as a power trio, one guitarist switches between both roles. In larger rock and metal bands, there is often a rhythm guitarist and a lead guitarist.
28 Angus Young Angus McKinnon Young is an Australian guitarist of Scottish origin, best known as the co-founder, lead guitarist, songwriter and sole constant member of the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. When performing live he does his own version of Chuck Berry’s “duck walk” and has also spun on his side while …read more.
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul. Gibson did not present their Gibson Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public, as they did not believe the solid-body style would catch on. Another early solid-body Spanish style guitar, resembling what would become Gibson’s Les Paul guitar a decade later, was developed in 1941 by O.W. Appleton, of Nogales, Arizona.[25] Appleton made contact with both Gibson and Fender but was unable to sell the idea behind his “App” guitar to either company.[26] In 1946, Merle Travis commissioned steel guitar builder Paul Bigsby to build him a solid-body Spanish-style electric.[27] Bigsby delivered the guitar in 1948. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender Esquire and Fender Broadcaster (later to become the Fender Telecaster), first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster.[28] Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and more comfortable ergonomics than other models.
Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
This will be interesting, I’ve never met anyone who transferred from the violin to the guitar. I would imagine it makes things easier, since that’s a stringed instrument as well, albeit very different. I played trumpet before guitar, but that wasn’t much help to me obviously 🙂
In the 1960s, the tonal palette of the electric guitar was further modified by introducing effect units in its signal path, before the guitar amp, of which one of the earliest units was the fuzz pedal. Effects units come in several formats, the most common of which are the stompbox “pedal” and the rackmount unit. A stomp box (or pedal) is a small metal or plastic box containing the circuitry, which is placed on the floor in front of the musician and connected in line with the patch cord connected to the instrument. The box is typically controlled by one or more foot-pedal on-off switches and it typically contains only one or two effects. Pedals are smaller than rackmount effects and usually less expensive. “Guitar pedalboards” are used by musicians who use multiple stomp-boxes; these may be a DIY project made with plywood or a commercial stock or custom-made pedalboard.
Great for beginner guitar players, the electric guitar packages/electric guitar kits give you all the essential tools that’ll help you get started on your musical journey. These electric guitar packs typically include an electric guitar, a guitar amplifier, and various must-have guitar accessories including guitar picks,guitar straps, and an electric guitar gig bag.
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Firstly theres no specific book for learning to play the electric guitar, its just a series of books to learn the guitar. My recommendation to you, learn to play on the acoustic guitar, then playing in the electric will be a peice of cake.
Most of these electric guitars have a body that is composed of solid wood. This is because wood produces a full and rich sound. A few of these guitars consist of laminate construction in the body, while a small number are comprised of acrylic bodies. Acrylic allows for an eye-catching, transparent look.
Very good list. Glaring ommission but forgiveable would be the studio musicians who you have heard for years but never knew their names. Cats like Tommy Tedesco, Howard Roberts, Jerry Cole, Bill Pitman & Glen Cambell, Yes he could play. Other Country cats like Chet Atkins, Doc Watson, Jerry Reed, & Roy Clark. Jazz giants like Kenny Burrell, Pat Martino, & Barney Kessel – also a studio guy from the wrecking crew. Accoustic players like Leo Kottke, or Christopher Parkening.
Before you begin, it’s important to understand that a book can’t teach you guitar. They’re great as references and serve as a fine starting point, but soon enough, you need to take what you’ve learned and try to integrate it into a performative craft alongside other musicians. If you find yourself getting stuck, take the exercise you’re on to a jam with like-minded musicians who can help you work practically with the material. At the very least, set a backing track and learn how to time those new skills. So much of playing is about feel, which is a magical combination of timing and groove that only exists in the moment.
Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. Guitars may have a fixed bridge or a spring-loaded hinged bridge that lets players “bend” the pitch of notes or chords up or down or perform vibrato effects. The sound of a guitar can be modified by new playing techniques such as string bending, tapping, hammering on, using audio feedback, or slide guitar playing. There are several types of electric guitar, including the solid-body guitar, various types of hollow-body guitars, the six-string guitar (the most common type, usually tuned E, A, D, G, B, E, from lowest to highest strings), the seven-string guitar, which typically adds a low B string below the low E, and the twelve-string electric guitar, which has six pairs of strings.
The structure of the lessons are good, it varies between guitar technical stuff and theory as you progress, meaning that you won’t get bored of any single topic, and you’ll have a chance to try out the theoretical bits one step at a time. It’s a shame they never made newer editions of this book with more graphics and supplemental audio-video tools.
In Vietnam, electric guitars are often used as an instrument in cải lương music (traditional southern Vietnamese folk opera), sometimes as a substitute for certain traditional stringed instruments like the Đàn nguyệt (two-stringed lute) when they are not available. Electric guitars used in cải lương are played in finger vibrato (string bending), with no amplifiers or sound effects.
Don’t worry that by choosing one over the other, you have locked yourself into that type of guitar for the rest of your life. Our experience has been that many players who start with one kind of guitar will, in time, gravitate to the other. Motivation for playing an instrument changes over time, and will occur naturally as your skills develop and the desire to play and learn becomes internalized. You will most likely develop skills on both the electric and acoustic guitars and enjoy a lifetime of learning and playing a variety of musical styles.
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Twelve-string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, but they create a much fuller tone, with the additional strings adding a natural chorus effect. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm parts, rather than for guitar solos. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string guitar, usually acoustic with a pickup.
Fender held an event in New York to introduce the lineup, and I attended and got to sample a few of the new guitars. These are China-made instruments, but the quality is quite good (as it is for Fender’s more traditional Paramount lineup of acoustics, which I’ve also fiddled with) and there’s no questioning how much fun it is to get your hands on such expressive axes.
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Don’t forget to check the action. If it’s too high you will really struggle when it comes to barre chords and power chords later on. Make sure you have a play of it and make sure it feels comfortable for you.
After distortion became popular amongst rock music groups, guitar amplifier manufacturers included various provisions for it as part of amplifier design, making amps easier to overdrive, and providing separate “dirty” and “clean” channels so that distortion could easily be switched on and off. The distortion characteristics of vacuum tube amplifiers are particularly sought-after in blues and many rock music genres, and various attempts have been made to emulate them without the disadvantages (e.g., fragility, low power, expense) of actual tubes. Distortion, especially in tube based amplifiers, can come from several sources: power supply sag as more power is demanded than the supply can provide at a steady voltage, deliberate gain over drive of active elements, or alterations in the feedback provisions for various circuit stages.[21]
well.. first.. i’am bassist, and also an audio engineer for my band. and my my guitarist is struggling to find an affordable Electric Guitar, so.. i showed her this web. and she ended up buying the fender modern player tele. and it sounds beautiful!! i was amazed by the tone of this guitar. well.. Many Thanks, mate!!!
Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.

Mr. White is an incredibly underrated guitarist. His singles (From the White Stripes) always span with just three to four chords and his simplistic blues rhythm and picking styles have him overlooked most of the time. However, his masterful use of the Digitech Whammy and is erratic playing make for some of the most memorable guitar solos ever. Check out Ball and a Biscuit and try not to like that solo. One of my favorite Jack White moments was during the 2004 Grammys, where he took 7 Nation Army and went into a cover of Son House’s Death Letter (another artist who I had to unwillingly cut out of the list). In an awards show celebrating Justin Timberlake and Missy Eliot, Jack White took time to give a salute to where things got started, to an artist born a century ago.
Super useful article. I read about every model and in the end chose the Epiphone Les Paul. Got the vintage sunburst color. From Amazon with a 10w practice amp, electronic tuner and soft sided case the whole kit only came to $209 and had free shipping.
good list, but why is duane allman #49. he should be a rock solid top 5 guitarist on everyones list. its like having michael jordan as the #49 greatest basketball player. duane died at 24 and think about the many guitarist he influenced
Written by longstanding Gibson correspondent Dave Hunter and guitar historian Walter Carter, this DVD and spiral-bound book set covers the complete range of Gibson guitars. Read excerpts of the book here, here, and here.
On guitar, the note patterns are a little more complex because each string has a different arrangement of notes. For a beginner, it is much more difficult to know which string to use when the pitch goes higher or lower. Unlike a piano, the guitar needs to be tuned before you play, which is another learning curve students must conquer quickly. Otherwise, they will only be able to tune once a week when they see their guitar teacher.
In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine published a list called The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. This list included 100 guitarists whom the magazine editor David Fricke considered the best, with a brief introduction for each of them.[2] The first in this list is the American guitarist Jimi Hendrix introduced by Pete Townshend, guitarist for The Who, who was, in his turn, ranked at #50 in the list.
Spend a little time learning how to play them cleanly, making sure every note pressed rings clear and every string you don’t need is muted. Trust me, nothing breaks the ambiance of a beautiful song like a muffled or sloppy chord.
Reading chords is quite simple because of the diagram and some numbers wherein you know what the numbers of your fingers are. With that idea in mind you should learn how to read chord. Start with some of the most important chords first and you will be able to see millions of songs playing these chords.
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5 Replies to “electric guitar gig bags | easy electric guitar songs for beginners”

  1. what about #1 ralph Machio..kicked vai’s butt I done seen it in a movie…vai claims he played both parts but I think it was machio who played both parts.. I done saw it in the movie..it must be true…he done beat the devil’s minions at the crossroads…ok that was just a joke lol…you should expand this list to create a who mattered in guitar, or even any guitarist who played on or put out an album, what about david spinozza, in the 70’s disco era he was a big session guy,morse,mclaughlin, leo kotke, david torn, henry kaiser,rick emmett, trevor, rabin, denis taaffe oh wait thats me…lol Truth is there is no best guitarists, each guitarist has their own style which is why playing guitar is great.You may like a players music or style and not another that doesnt make one better than another. One might be great in technique but his music might be generic or the opposite/maybe you meant the most popular guitarist according to opinion? sales? hype?
    Many people think that electric guitars are going to be loud when they are plugged in… well, they do have a volume control, so you can control the volume. Also, be aware that you do not have to plug them in! I do probably half of my practice on electric guitar without any amp at all. It’s good to get the notes ringing out loud and clear without an amp, so as a beginner you might want to put all your money into getting a cool guitar and leave getting an amp until later.
    While an acoustic guitar’s sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar’s body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be “shaped” on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.
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    Not a particular body shape as such, more a tool designed specifically for playing heavier styles of music like metal and punk. Metal guitars are still made of wood – let’s get that clear – but feature certain characteristics designed to help players in these genres reach faster playing speeds and at higher volumes. Metal guitars will often feature active pickups, which require a battery and provide a slight boost to the signal before it reaches the amplifier. They may also offer a significantly thinner neck to aid players looking to travel up and down the fretboard at higher speed. You’re more than likely sacrificing versatility if you go down this route, but it’s always best to get the right tool for the job and if rocking out is your thing you should definitely check these out. The big names in this world are Ibanez and ESP, although many players from this genre find Les Paul shaped guitars are more than up to the task.
    With expiration of the Fender patent on the Stratocaster-style vibrato, various improvements on this type of internal, multi-spring vibrato system are now available. Floyd Rose introduced one of the first improvements on the vibrato system in many years when, in the late 1970s, he experimented with “locking” nuts and bridges that prevent the guitar from losing tuning, even under heavy vibrato bar use.
    Electric Guitar Buying Guide Which Electric Guitar Should I Choose? Acoustic Guitar Buying Guide A Simple Guide To The Fixed Electric Guitar Bridge A Guide To The Main Electric Guitar Pickup Types Electric Guitar Strings Guide
    If you’ve read our full reviewof the 50s Stratocaster, you’ll know that this Classic Vibe Stratocaster is an excellent prospect for any beginner who loves the good old days of rock n’ roll! Made by Squier, this 50s-inspired electric has huge vintage appeal, with a modern feel thanks to a trio of Alnico III single-coil pickups and a smooth, modern C-shaped maple neck (with 21 medium jumbo frets). The body is made from solid alder with all the classic Strat style you’d expect from a Fender subsidiary, with a real vintage look (especially in the Sherwood Green with matching headstock). As for the sound, the three single-coils give it authentic Strat tone – well balanced with great clarity and sustain. Affordable, but far from an entry-level model, this is one of the best Squiers around.
    As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.

  2. Often people want to know what kind of guitar is easier to play. There are physical differences between electric and acoustic guitars that may be considered. However, we believe the kind of guitar you “want” to play is the easiest to learn on, as you will be more likely to establish good practice habits early in the process.
    Some of the other that you can check is Amaj, Cmaj, Dmaj, Emaj, Cmaj9 and Gmaj. Those are the major chords that you can start to grip on. For the minor chords are the following: Ami, which is similar to Emaj wherein you will see in a chord chart that Ami really looks like Emaj, and the Emi. Those are the only two minor chords that you need to now right now because when we get to barre chords where you will learn later on after getting on the scales and riffs. Then you will learn all the minor chords across the entire guitar lesson.
    Finally, the sound. The single most important factor in choosing a guitar is the sound which it will help you achieve. It’s here where things can start getting complicated. You’ll learn over time that while certain guitars may look the part, and may fit the budget, they simply won’t cut it for the style of music you’re trying to play. Over the course of this guide we’ll refer back to a guitar’s ‘tone’ – this is the term used by guitarists to describe the overall sound their guitar puts out. Some tones are better suited to certain types of music, while other tones can only be achieved using certain combinations of gear. Either way, it helps to have an idea of the kind of sound you’re trying to achieve as this will have the most critical impact on the guitars which will suit you and your playing best.
    Playing the guitar well is not about strength but about control. As you watch any professional musician you will notice how they appear to effortlessly finesse their instrument. The easiest guitar to play is the one you are truly interested in.
    When buying an electric guitar, you should know the level of experience of the person you are purchasing it for. Electric guitar cost for beginners is typically much lower than that made for experienced guitar players. It is also worth noting that left-handed electric guitars are often more expensive than their right-handed counterparts. Consider the need for more expensive hardware, as you can shave some cost off of the purchase by avoiding floating bridges and active pickups. Also, you can lower the associated electric guitar cost by purchasing a gig-bag instead of case, or a soft case instead of a hard case.
    Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Alvino Rey (Phil Spitalney Orchestra), Les Paul (Fred Waring Orchestra), Danny Stewart (Andy Iona Orchestra), George Barnes (under many aliases), Lonnie Johnson, Floyd Smith, Big Bill Broonzy, T-Bone Walker, George Van Eps, Charlie Christian (Benny Goodman Orchestra), Tampa Red, Memphis Minnie, and Arthur Crudup.

  3. Jackson’s JS22 Dinky is an affordable guitar that would suit advanced players as much as it would beginners! With a good dose of edge and elegance, it’s perfect for anything from soft rock to thrash metal. It’s a great looking instrument – featuring an arched-top basswood body with a deep double-cutaway design, allowing ample access to 24 jumbo frets on the neck, which is a bolt-on graphite-reinforced maple ‘speed’ neck. It’s fast, sturdy, and fun to play on. The guitar is voiced by two high-output Jackon-designed humbuckers, which offer the classic Jackson tone, and make light work of both clean and distorted tones. The black hardware, tremolo bridge, and classic Jackson headstock finish it off nicely. Check out our full review of the JS22 here.
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    Some steel-string acoustic guitars are fitted with pickups purely as an alternative to using a separate microphone. They may also be fitted with a piezoelectric pickup under the bridge, attached to the bridge mounting plate, or with a low-mass microphone (usually a condenser mic) inside the body of the guitar that converts the vibrations in the body into electronic signals. Combinations of these types of pickups may be used, with an integral mixer/preamp/graphic equalizer. Such instruments are called electric acoustic guitars. They are regarded as acoustic guitars rather than electric guitars, because the pickups do not produce a signal directly from the vibration of the strings, but rather from the vibration of the guitar top or body.
    However the process of picking and separating the good from the bad can be tiresome and littered with pitfalls. Fear not – check out some of our reviews below and go from there. Here are the best affordable electric guitars that will not break your bank:
    B.C. Rich manufactured a ten-string six-course electric guitar, the Bich, whose radical shape positioned the machine heads for the four secondary strings onto the body, avoiding the head-heaviness of many electric twelve-string guitars. However, many players bought it for the body shape or electrics and simply removed the extra strings. The company recognized this and released six-string models of the Bich, a shape now generally incorporated into their standard Warlock.
    An entry-level offering from Dean, with rock in its heart. With a couple of different bold color options to choose from, it features a solid paulownia body with Dean’s familiar Vendetta double-cutaway shape and winged headstock, while the slim bolt-on maple neck has a rosewood fretboard housing 24 frets. When it comes to features, this XMT doesn’t boast many, but it does the simple things well. Two passive Dean-designed humbuckers at the bridge and the neck handle all kinds of heavier rock very well, while a tone control and a three-way pickup selector switch offer enough versatility. It also comes with a vintage tremolo bridge and whammy bar for some cool vibrato effects. Be sure to read our full review of the XMT.

  4. No! There’s no reason advanced players couldn’t enjoy using them either – especially with the performance that some of them offer. As they are so affordable, I wouldn’t bet against experienced players fancying a couple to add to their collections.
    I’ve decided to take on a friends daughter as my first guitar student (which would light a fire under my behind to learn to play this instrument I’ve invested in) and I was wondering if you had any suggestions on a book or series besides the Hal Leonard. Something Suzuki-esque book wise if possible.
    The thing I like about your list is that you make an impressive effort to include amazing guitarists from multiple genres. Usually these kind of lists say more about musical tastes of the person who is making the list instead of fairly objective evaluation of skill. I would add Christopher Parkening (classical) and Tommy Tedesco (anything). They said Tommy could play ANYTHING and do it better than anyone. I appreciate your saying the list is not complete. I would suggest removing the numbers and just list the names, as many of your commenters didn’t seem to read your opening qualifiers. LOL.
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    As you can see, there are different guitars for every budget, genre and style of playing. The trick is to work out what you’re trying to achieve, whether you value versatility, comfort or specialisation more, and what you’re willing to pay to get your ideal guitar. We hope you enjoyed our electric guitar buying guide but for more information, visit any of our stores and our product specialists will be happy to talk you through some of the considerations. More importantly, can let you try a few different styles out for yourself.

  5. If you were to ask all of the guitarists on the top 20, Jeff beck would be crowned number one. His technique and tone is like no other. He makes the guitar sing and was the first to ever be in that realm.
    Piezoelectric pickups use a “sandwich” of quartz crystal or other piezoelectric material, typically placed beneath the string saddles or nut. These devices respond to pressure changes from all vibration at these specific points.
    ^ For more on this subject see Tomaro, Robert (1994). “Contemporary compositional techniques for the electric guitar in United States concert music”. Journal of New Music Research. 23 (4): 349. doi:10.1080/09298219408570664.
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    The chord below (an Am) is going to be used for demonstration. Firstly, you’ll notice the name of the chord labeled up the top. Next you’ll see a “grid” below it. This grid represents your guitar fretboard. The 6 lines running downwards represent the six strings on your guitar with the fattest and lowest sounding string on the left hand side. The horizontal lines represent the frets on your guitar neck. The top line is the top of the neck.
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    Electric guitars are generally the easiest to play: the strings are thinner, the ‘action’ is low (see below) and therefore they are easier to press down. Barre chords on acoustic guitar can be very demanding and require a lot of finger strength. Cheaper acoustic guitars can be very hard to play higher up the fretboard. Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don’t project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.
    One of the most popular instruments ever known to the world, the guitar is something truly special. Versatile in its ability to play different genres, and coming in a variety of styles, every guitar has something different to offer, allowing musicians to make their individual instrument truly their own. From highly sought after models, to everyday pick up and play options, the guitars found here were made to accommodate literally every need a guitarist could ever have.
    TheGuitarLesson.com, created by Tom Fontana, is dedicated to bringing the highest quality guitar tutorials to beginner guitarists. Through creating fun and engaging guitar lessons, we aim to spread our love of the guitar to as many new players as possible.
    The thing I like about your list is that you make an impressive effort to include amazing guitarists from multiple genres. Usually these kind of lists say more about musical tastes of the person who is making the list instead of fairly objective evaluation of skill. I would add Christopher Parkening (classical) and Tommy Tedesco (anything). They said Tommy could play ANYTHING and do it better than anyone. I appreciate your saying the list is not complete. I would suggest removing the numbers and just list the names, as many of your commenters didn’t seem to read your opening qualifiers. LOL.

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