electric guitar book | legacy electric guitar red

George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds brought the electric twelve-string to notability in rock and roll. During the Beatles’ first trip to the United States, in February 1964, Harrison received a new 360/12 model guitar from the Rickenbacker company, a twelve-string electric made to look onstage like a six-string. He began using the 360 in the studio on Lennon’s “You Can’t Do That” and other songs. McGuinn began using electric twelve-string guitars to create the jangly, ringing sound of the Byrds. Both Jimmy Page, the guitarist with Led Zeppelin, and Leo Kottke, a solo artist, are well known as twelve-string guitar players.
An excerpt: “No amount of tuning will suffice if your guitar is not intonated properly. Intonation at the nut is best left to the hands of your local repairman, but bridge intonation in most cases is a do-it-yourself job.”
No book is ever going to be a suitable replacement for an actual guitar teacher, but if you want a straight forward guide that will set out the foundations in a clear and easy to digest manner this book is great.
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The road toward becoming a better guitarist is paved in… books? It certainly can be, although there are plenty of routes that both beginners and professionals take to improve upon — and bone up on — their craft. The books on this list are about history and technique. They’re books that you’ll pull off the shelf for years to come to look up a vintage guitar you’re curious about or a chord progression or song you’ve been meaning to master. You may find additional inspiration reading the autobiographies of your favorite guitarists, but we decided to leave those off this particular list. If you’re in the market for a good guitar book, read on.
Also note that electro-acoustics are not electric guitars. They are acoustic instruments with electronics fitted so that they can be amplified, but you would not normally need to plug them in to get a good sound out of them.
With this new edition, they scrapped the DVD from the previous version, and introduced online video and audio clips, as a supplement to the book’s teachings. They didn’t take it overboard though, with just 85 videos and 95 audio tracks, but at least it’s a step in the right direction. You can’t learn music by just reading about it, you need audible tools.
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender’s Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.

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Go ahead & call me a book worm or ban me & my books, but I can assure you that I have used all forms & methods of learning musical instruments including videos, and my favourite & fastest way of learning still remain books.
One of the most frequently asked questions from beginner players is whether to choose electric or acoustic. The advice here is my view. Others may disagree, and they are welcome to their opinion; mine is subject to change without notice! Check out the FAQ at the bottom of the page too!
This root note concept applies to many things on guitar. In fact, it applies to pretty much everything that does not use open strings. All scales and chords that don’t use open strings can just be moved up and down the neck. As long as you know which note is the root note, you will be able to find that chord or scale.
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Beginner’s Guide to Electric Guitar is all you need to start playing electric guitar. With an easy-to-understand and down-to-earth tone, this book gets to the important stuff first and doesn’t bog you down with all the details. Learn all about the different types of electric guitars, amplifiers, and effects, and learn how to play like Led Zeppelin, The White Stripes, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Green Day, Metallica, Nirvana, Rage Against the Machine, Jimi Hendrix, AC/DC, Alice in Chains, and more. To keep things simple, the music examples are written in TAB only and are designed to get you playing quickly—from riffs on a single string to power chords, pentatonic scales, and tunes in drop-D tuning. The accompanying CD features a full band to play along with.
“We’ve never really had the same commitment to pedals and acoustic guitars as we’ve had to electric guitars and amps,” Mooney told me, describing the new California range as a fork in the road that will redefine Fender’s product mission moving forward.
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the “stereo” effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1/4-inch plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
Some steel-string acoustic guitars are fitted with pickups purely as an alternative to using a separate microphone. They may also be fitted with a piezoelectric pickup under the bridge, attached to the bridge mounting plate, or with a low-mass microphone (usually a condenser mic) inside the body of the guitar that converts the vibrations in the body into electronic signals. Combinations of these types of pickups may be used, with an integral mixer/preamp/graphic equalizer. Such instruments are called electric acoustic guitars. They are regarded as acoustic guitars rather than electric guitars, because the pickups do not produce a signal directly from the vibration of the strings, but rather from the vibration of the guitar top or body.
On an electric guitar, the vibrations of the stings are picked up and amplified electronically. Typically, the body is solid (not hollow like an acoustic guitar), although there are some semi-hollow body electric guitars. A full hollow-body electric is basically an acoustic-electric hybrid with pickups. The Internet Guitar Database names the parts of an electric guitar[1] .
Tapping, in which both hands are applied to the fretboard. Tapping may be performed either one-handed or two-handed. It is an extended technique, executed by using one hand to tap the strings against the fingerboard, thus producing legato notes. Tapping usually incorporates pull-offs or hammer-ons as well, where the fingers of the left hand play a sequence of notes in synchronization with the tapping hand.
Player’s is the kind of place where you could drop by, grab a chair and listen to some great stories, and even partake in some great conversation. And when it comes to guitars; be it lessons, repair, sales, purchases and trades, and just pure knowledge; the place is second to none! And the staff: the guitar instructors, are absolutely the epitome in their profession.
Electric guitars are very popular, leading to the flooding of the market with cheap models under $300. This is not necessarily a bad thing however, as some of these less expensive guitars actually play fairly well and sound acceptable.
With expiration of the Fender patent on the Stratocaster-style vibrato, various improvements on this type of internal, multi-spring vibrato system are now available. Floyd Rose introduced one of the first improvements on the vibrato system in many years when, in the late 1970s, he experimented with “locking” nuts and bridges that prevent the guitar from losing tuning, even under heavy vibrato bar use.
Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep, fully hollow bodies and are often capable of being played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar, and therefore of being used unplugged at intimate gigs. The instrument originated during the jazz age of the 1920s and 1930s, and is still considered the classic jazz guitar, nicknamed the “jazzbox.” Like semi-hollow guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes. Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavily, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation (popular in country and rockabilly) with single-coil pickups and sometimes a Bigsby tremolo has a distinctly more twangy, biting, tone than the classic jazzbox.
The lesson curriculum is not really my style, but all teachers vary. It focuses too soon on too much theory, and I believe in getting my students playing and having fun, thereby develop a love for the instrument quickly, rather than indulging in theoretical studies.
The guitar output jack typically provides a monaural signal. Many guitars with active electronics use a jack with an extra contact normally used for stereo. These guitars use the extra contact to break the ground connection to the on-board battery to preserve battery life when the guitar is unplugged. These guitars require a mono plug to close the internal switch and connect the battery to ground. Standard guitar cables use a high-impedance 1/4-inch (6.35-mm) mono plug. These have a tip and sleeve configuration referred to as a TS phone connector. The voltage is usually around 1 to 9 millivolts.
These guitars work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Semi-hollowbodies are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, ’60s pop and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes, though these can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B.B. King’s famous Lucille.
One of the most popular instruments ever known to the world, the guitar is something truly special. Versatile in its ability to play different genres, and coming in a variety of styles, every guitar has something different to offer, allowing musicians to make their individual instrument truly their own. From highly sought after models, to everyday pick up and play options, the guitars found here were made to accommodate literally every need a guitarist could ever have.
In the 1960s, the tonal palette of the electric guitar was further modified by introducing effect units in its signal path, before the guitar amp, of which one of the earliest units was the fuzz pedal. Effects units come in several formats, the most common of which are the stompbox “pedal” and the rackmount unit. A stomp box (or pedal) is a small metal or plastic box containing the circuitry, which is placed on the floor in front of the musician and connected in line with the patch cord connected to the instrument. The box is typically controlled by one or more foot-pedal on-off switches and it typically contains only one or two effects. Pedals are smaller than rackmount effects and usually less expensive. “Guitar pedalboards” are used by musicians who use multiple stomp-boxes; these may be a DIY project made with plywood or a commercial stock or custom-made pedalboard.
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