electric guitar songs easy | electric guitar value

Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. However, some features are present on most guitars. The photo below shows the different parts of an electric guitar. The headstock (1) contains the metal machine heads (1.1), which use a worm gear for tuning. The nut (1.4)—a thin fret-like strip of metal, plastic, graphite or bone—supports the strings at the headstock end of the instrument. The frets (2.3) are thin metal strips that stop the string at the correct pitch when the player pushes a string against the fingerboard. The truss rod (1.2) is a metal rod (usually adjustable) that counters the tension of the strings to keep the neck straight. Position markers (2.2) provide the player with a reference to the playing position on the fingerboard.[13]
44 Eric Johnson Eric Johnson (born August 17, 1954) is an American guitarist, songwriter, and vocalist from Austin, Texas. Best known for his electric guitar skills, Johnson is also a highly proficient acoustic, lap steel, resonator, and bass guitarist as well as an accomplished pianist and vocalist.
3 Eddie Van Halen Edward Lodewijk “Eddie” Van Halen is a Dutch-American musician, songwriter and producer. He is best known as the lead guitarist, occasional keyboardist and co-founder of the hard rock band Van Halen.
Also, there are some cheaper Ibanez guitars that sound great. Fender Squires are not bad either, though I’ve seen some badly set up ones with really cheap fittings, so be careful. Buying a proper USA-built Fender Stratocaster will always be awesome though if you have the budget!
Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
Learning to play a musical instrument is a challenging but ultimately rewarding experience. The guitar is no exception. If you are thinking of getting a guitar, you don’t need to head out to a specialty guitar store. Best Buy carries a range of acoustic and electric guitars for sale that will accommodate beginners as well as experienced musicians. An acoustic guitar does not require additional amplification to be heard, but an electric guitar does. Some acoustic guitars come with electronics built in so you can create your music both ways. If you buy an electric guitar, you will also want to purchase a guitar amplifier. As you progress, you may want to buy guitar pedals to create different sounds.

In 2002, Gibson announced the first digital guitar, which performs analog-to-digital conversion internally. The resulting digital signal is delivered over a standard Ethernet cable, eliminating cable-induced line noise. The guitar also provides independent signal processing for each individual string. In 2003, modelling amplifier maker Line 6 introduced the Variax guitar. It differs in some fundamental ways from conventional solid-body electrics. It has on-board electronics capable of modelling the sound of a variety of unique guitars and some other stringed instruments. At one time, some models featured piezoelectric pickups instead of the conventional electromagnetic pickups.
While both guitar lessons and piano lessons provide a better opportunity for learning to read and understand music than say, singing lessons, piano teachers traditionally provide a formal foundation in music theory and how to read music. On the other hand, guitar teachers may start off with a beginner’s book, but they often move into teaching by ear and example within a few months. The exception here would be classical guitar lessons, where students learn through graded lesson books and have to pass RCM exams. For other guitar lesson styles, you can also ask your teacher to include music theory and note reading in your lessons; a quality instructor would be happy to oblige.
Solid body guitars offer a fantastic platform for builders, allowing them to craft the wood into literally any shape. Naturally you’ll probably want to opt for a guitar with a single-cutaway Les Paul or Telecaster style shape, or a double-cutaway shape like a Stratocaster, Yamaha Pacifica, or Ibanez’s RG. However, the more extroverted beginner can check out some cool styles that always catch the attention, such as V or Z shaped guitars, or anything from Dean Guitars – especially if you want an eye-catching paint job!
Popular music typically uses the electric guitar in two roles: as a rhythm guitar to provide the basic chord progression and rhythm, and a lead guitar that plays melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In some bands with two guitarists, both may play in tandem, and trade off rhythm and lead roles. In bands with a single guitarist, the guitarist may switch between these roles, playing chords to accompany the singer’s lyrics, and a solo.
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Semi-acoustic guitars have a hollow body (similar in depth to a solid-body guitar) and electronic pickups mounted on the body. They work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Whereas chambered guitars are made, like solid-body guitars, from a single block of wood, semi-acoustic and full-hollowbody guitars bodies are made from thin sheets of wood. They do not provide enough acoustic volume for live performance, but they can be used unplugged for quiet practice. Semi-acoustics are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive, or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, sixties pop, and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes. These can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B. B. King’s famous Lucille. Feedback can also be reduced by making them with a solid block in the middle of the soundbox.
If the book had been proofread better, I’d give it 5 stars. For example, there are places where the text has both a fret number and standard musical notation, and the fret number is wrong. The book refers you to play along with the instructional CD backing tracks, but it doesn’t tell you which track number to play. It’s easy enough to figure out what was meant, but a little more care would have been better.
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender’s Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.
The guitarist may also employ various methods for selecting notes and chords, including fingering, thumbing, the barre (a finger lying across many or all strings at a particular fret), and ‘bottleneck’ or steel-guitar slides, usually made of glass or metal. These left- and right-hand techniques may be intermixed in performance.
Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches. Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars’ compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.
So…I’m violist and I teach violin and viola professionally. I know my music theory and I’m having a hell of a time transferring that knowledge to the guitar. I’ve tried the Hal Leonard book and like you said..it is ass-numbingly dull.
Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep bodies made of glued-together sheets, or “plates”, of wood. They can often be played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar and therefore can be used unplugged at intimate gigs. They qualify as electric guitars inasmuch as they have fitted pickups. Historically, archtop guitars with retrofitted pickups were among the very earliest electric guitars. The instrument originated during the Jazz Age, in the 1920s and 1930s, and are still considered the classic jazz guitar (nicknamed “jazzbox”). Like semi-acoustic guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes.
Admit it. You’ve slow danced to Stairway To Heaven before. Page’s playing have influenced so many guitar players of today, and Led Zeppelin revolutionized Rock and Roll blending acoustic guitars, banjos, and mandolins while still staying with the same gritty rock image. His guitar riffs are forever etched into Rock and Roll’s hall of fame. How influential was he? Step into a guitar store, and you’ll see. Thousands of 12 year old kids across the globe are playing the intro to Stairway. Now that’s how you know you’ve made it.
I’m sorry but I do not like Green Day, I may be the only one who thinks this, and get yelled at for saying this… But I truly believe they’re overplayed on classic rock AND new music stations. They play them on every station, for music, on this planet! I get it people like them and all, but really, “Brain stew” Is a very overplayed song.
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the “stereo” effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1/4-inch plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
In the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, a growing number of composers (many of them composer-performers who had grown up playing the instrument in rock bands) began writing contemporary classical music for the electric guitar. These include Frank Zappa, Shawn Lane, Steven Mackey, Nick Didkovsky, Scott Johnson, Lois V Vierk, Tim Brady, Tristan Murail, and Randall Woolf.
Who’s ready !!!! Monsters of Mock III – PARTY BUS …. Saturday July 29th …. at Joe’s Live Rosemont …. $40 for show ticket and bus ride or $32 for bus (If you already have your ticket). BEER WILL BE PROVIDED AS ALWAYS along with water and soda. Please contact Amy Kasanders or Celia Vlahos or any of the boys of Motley II or Night Train for purchase or info.
The > symbol is called an accent. It tells you to play those notes a little louder than the others. This forms a rhythmic pattern that gives a song a certain flavor, such as a Latin flavor, a Bo Diddley flavor, a polka flavor, or even a tutti-frutti flavor.
Playing guitar is an exercise in memorization. There’s really no way around it. You have to remember stuff, and the primary thing you have to remember is where notes are on the fretboard. Eventually, muscle and ear memory will kick in and the remembering will get easier, but for the first little while, every time you play guitar, it’s like a pop quiz. It’s not fun to memorize something by brute force, but it pays dividends. This book teaches you how to visualize the notes, which will lead quickly to remembering them. Once you know where the notes are, forming chords becomes easier, which leads to fluid playing in any position. At the very least, if you can identify your root notes, you can bail yourself out of trouble at any time. That skill for resolution serves you in improvisation and the random jams that will provide much of your growth.
MAB’s Speed Kills is essential if you want great picking technique. The Troy Grady channel on youtube is really good for any technique related questions about pretty much anything. There are some amazing Guthrie Govan lessons out there, and I reckon there was a Buckethead tapping lesson in a magazine somewhere.
Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavlly, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation with single-coil pickups, and sometimes with a Bigsby tremolo, has long been popular in country and rockabilly; it has a distinctly more twangy, biting tone than the classic jazzbox. The term archtop refers to a method of construction subtly different from the typical acoustic (or “folk” or “western” or “steel-string” guitar): the top is formed from a moderately thick (1 inch or 2–3 cm) piece of wood, which is then carved into a thin (0.1 in, or 2–3 mm) domed shape, whereas conventional acoustic guitars have a thin, flat top.
For a beginner, it is easier to learn and memorise the notes on a piano because they repeat in the same pattern across all the keys. To make things even easier, most piano teachers will start off with teaching only the white keys for adults (a total of 7), or all black keys for kids (total of 5). Once those are mastered, then the rest of the notes come into play. It is also easier for beginners to understand musical patterns on a piano. When you read sheet music and the notes move downwards, you know you’re moving to the left along the piano keys. Intervals, which are the measurable distances between notes, are very easy to identify. This makes it easier to play pattern-based songs in your first month of lessons.
The cost of an electric guitar can range from under $100 to several thousands of dollars. There are a multitude of factors that contribute to the cost of electric guitars. The condition of a guitar is probably the most important of those factors. A guitar will not be worth much at all if it is unplayable and in need of serious repair. The age is another important part of determining the electric guitar cost. When the condition of the guitar is nearly perfect, the general rule is that guitar cost rises as the age of the guitar rises. This may not be intuitive, but there is a great demand for well-kept older guitars. The components of the guitar (hardware) make a difference in the guitar cost as well. Guitars with floating bridges (Floyd Rose for example) will usually be more expensive than the same model with a fixed bridge. The quality and quantity of the guitar’s pickups will influence the price. The “machinery” of the guitar includes its metal parts, like the bridge, tuners, and various plates. Machinery can be plated with different metals, altering the cost of the guitar. The construction of the instrument also has an effect on the price. Heavier and more sonically pleasant woods typically add to the cost while necks that are attached to the body in one-piece are often more expensive than those that are bolted on. The aesthetics of the electric guitar, mainly attributed to the paintjob and finish, also affect the guitar cost.
The distance from the strings to the neck is called the action. When it is very low it is easy to press the strings down; when it is too low the strings will buzz when you play. If a guitar’s action is too high it will be very hard to play, and for a beginner this can be pretty disheartening.
Materials for necks are selected for dimensional stability and rigidity, and some allege that they influence tone. Hardwoods are preferred, with maple, mahogany, and ash topping the list. The neck and fingerboard can be made from different materials; for example, a guitar may have a maple neck with a rosewood or ebony fingerboard. In the 1970s, designers began to use exotic man-made materials such as aircraft-grade aluminum, carbon fiber, and ebonol. Makers known for these unusual materials include John Veleno, Travis Bean, Geoff Gould, and Alembic.
The fourth type of system employs string-through body anchoring. The strings pass over the bridge saddles, then through holes through the top of the guitar body to the back. The strings are typically anchored in place at the back of the guitar by metal ferrules. Many believe this design improves a guitar’s sustain and timbre. A few examples of string-through body guitars are the Fender Telecaster Thinline, the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, the B.C. Rich IT Warlock and Mockingbird, and the Schecter Omen 6 and 7 series.
Following the death of Les Paul, TIME website presented their list of 10 greatest artists in electric guitar. As in Rolling Stone magazine’s list, Jimi Hendrix was chosen as the greatest guitarist followed by Slash from Guns ‘N’ Roses, B.B. King, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page,and Eric Clapton.[11] Gigwise.com, an online music magazine, also ranks Jimi Hendrix as the greatest guitarist ever, followed by Jimmy Page, B.B. King, Keith Richards and Kirk Hammett.[12]
Super useful article. I read about every model and in the end chose the Epiphone Les Paul. Got the vintage sunburst color. From Amazon with a 10w practice amp, electronic tuner and soft sided case the whole kit only came to $209 and had free shipping.
We’ve all been there, and it’s actually pretty easy to fix once you know how. The reason we hit those walls in our playing or get bored with what we’re currently doing is that we start falling into set patterns with our playing (pentatonic scale over and over again, anyone?). Whatever we’re playing starts to feel stale and derivative because we’ve gone over it so many times, and it can end up being a pretty frustrating experience.
When in doubt, reach for the Dummies guide. These standardized, annotated guides have taught countless people to do countless things that were once over their respective heads. Like the Hal Leonard complete guide above, this massive, 648 page door stop includes six different sub-books, including three basics volumes and three genre-specific guides. It’s the everything-to-everyone approach. It might be overwhelming, but at least you’ll have everything you need in one place.
Until the 1950s, the acoustic, nylon-stringed classical guitar was the only type of guitar favored by classical, or art music composers. In the 1950s a few contemporary classical composers began to use the electric guitar in their compositions. Examples of such works include Luciano Berio’s Nones (1954) Karlheinz Stockhausen’s Gruppen (1955–57); Donald Erb’s String Trio (1966), Morton Feldman’s The Possibility of a New Work for Electric Guitar (1966); George Crumb’s Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death (1968); Hans Werner Henze’s Versuch über Schweine (1968); Francis Thorne’s Sonar Plexus (1968) and Liebesrock (1968–69), Michael Tippett’s The Knot Garden (1965–70); Leonard Bernstein’s MASS (1971) and Slava! (1977); Louis Andriessen’s De Staat (1972–76); Helmut Lachenmann’s Fassade, für grosses Orchester (1973, rev. 1987), Valery Gavrilin Anyuta (1982), Steve Reich’s Electric Counterpoint (1987), Arvo Pärt’s Miserere (1989/92), György Kurtág’s Grabstein für Stephan (1989), and countless works composed for the quintet of Ástor Piazzolla. Alfred Schnittke also used electric guitar in several works, like the “Requiem”, “Concerto Grosso N°2” and “Symphony N°1”.
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Every guitar player has their own distinctive sound, and many guitar companies have created artist and signature electric guitar models that were inspired by and/or designed in collaboration with the very best guitar players from the past and the present. Some of the most popular signature electric guitar models we offer here at Sam Ash are the Eric Clapton Strat guitars from both Fender and the Fender Custom Shop, ESP Kirk Hammett guitars, John Petrucci guitars from both Ernie Ball Music Man and Sterling by Music Man, and many more!
Jackson’s JS22 Dinky is an affordable guitar that would suit advanced players as much as it would beginners! With a good dose of edge and elegance, it’s perfect for anything from soft rock to thrash metal. It’s a great looking instrument – featuring an arched-top basswood body with a deep double-cutaway design, allowing ample access to 24 jumbo frets on the neck, which is a bolt-on graphite-reinforced maple ‘speed’ neck. It’s fast, sturdy, and fun to play on. The guitar is voiced by two high-output Jackon-designed humbuckers, which offer the classic Jackson tone, and make light work of both clean and distorted tones. The black hardware, tremolo bridge, and classic Jackson headstock finish it off nicely. Check out our full review of the JS22 here.
If you have been playing for a year or two and are looking at something to replace your current model, it would be wise to save a little more and go for a mid-range guitar that may cost between $300 and $500. On this kind of guitar you’ll notice a big difference in sound, as well as the feel of the instrument and the overall playability. Use this page as a starting point to find something that may suit you. Until then, you are probably best off sticking with your current guitar.
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