electric guitar sizes | electric guitar specs

The biggest issue when starting out is not to get any bad habits with picking or hand/finger positioning. I’d highly recommend to find a teacher who – not necessarily on a periodical basis – would take a closer look at your progress and technique and make adjustments when needed. There are lots of bad habits that you can get and I’d rather spend some money on lessons than weeks of lifetime to undo those.
This popular book teaches seven guitar techniques — alternate picking, string skipping, string bending, arpeggios, sweep picking, legato, and rhythm — one for each day of the week, with an emphasis on keeping it fun so that the learning process comes naturally.
If my guitar playing friends can keep an eye out for these guitars, I had them stolen from me , one is a Gibson Les Paul , has a stinger on the back on the head… stock & a champagne glass on the front of the headstock , the other is a green BC Rich Gunslinger , any help would be appreciated
Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
This is the definitive source for all collectors of vintage American fretted instruments. In fact, the Gibson Customer Service department frequently turns to Gruhn’s Guide when faced with questions about a guitar’s authenticity or background.
The lesson curriculum is not really my style, but all teachers vary. It focuses too soon on too much theory, and I believe in getting my students playing and having fun, thereby develop a love for the instrument quickly, rather than indulging in theoretical studies.
He has surely got to be one of the greatest electric guitar players ever. He has everything. Some people just think he is fast, but it is his precision and technique. I have gotta be honest, Hendrix should be at the top.
Brian should be much higher on this list! He is a Musical Genius! I never listened to guitarists until I heard Brian May play! Everything he does is PERFECTIOIN! Put him at the Top 5 where he belongs!
If you have been playing for a year or two and are looking at something to replace your current model, it would be wise to save a little more and go for a mid-range guitar that may cost between $300 and $500. On this kind of guitar you’ll notice a big difference in sound, as well as the feel of the instrument and the overall playability. Use this page as a starting point to find something that may suit you. Until then, you are probably best off sticking with your current guitar.
Most of these electric guitars have a body that is composed of solid wood. This is because wood produces a full and rich sound. A few of these guitars consist of laminate construction in the body, while a small number are comprised of acrylic bodies. Acrylic allows for an eye-catching, transparent look.
The look of a guitar is, rightly or wrongly, a significant factor in most players’ buying decisions. Some will buy because a particular style of guitar fits in with their image or choice of genre, while others will buy simply because they like the exact hue of red in the sunburst. Either way, there’s no shame in listing a guitar’s appearance as a significant motivator in your purchasing journey. After all, you’ve got to want to play it so it helps if the thing is drop dead gorgeous.
It is possible to make power chords on other string groups too, but in normal playing you will only use root 6 and root 5 because they sound deep and powerful. The others are a lot less common and don’t tend to sound as good.
Country: Vince Gill and Brent Mason. Mason can play almost anything though, he is an incredible session player. Look for Mason’s song “Hot Wired” to hear his hot lickes. Gill has his own unique and tasty telecaster style. He just doesn’t generally be flashy on his own albums but Clapton has had him at the Crossroads festival so check that out.
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You could say that the book does what it promises, presents the beginner guitarist with an introduction to the guitar. It is aimed at complete beginners, and stops at the beginner level. It does not include any even remotely complex theoretical lessons.
In the most commercially available and consumed pop and rock genres, electric guitars tend to dominate their acoustic cousins in both the recording studio and live venues, especially in the “harder” genres such as heavy metal and hard rock. However the acoustic guitar remains a popular choice in country, western and especially bluegrass music, and it is widely used in folk music. Even metal and hard rock guitarists play acoustic guitars for some ballads and for MTV unplugged acoustic performances.
Admit it. You’ve slow danced to Stairway To Heaven before. Page’s playing have influenced so many guitar players of today, and Led Zeppelin revolutionized Rock and Roll blending acoustic guitars, banjos, and mandolins while still staying with the same gritty rock image. His guitar riffs are forever etched into Rock and Roll’s hall of fame. How influential was he? Step into a guitar store, and you’ll see. Thousands of 12 year old kids across the globe are playing the intro to Stairway. Now that’s how you know you’ve made it.
Electric guitars are very popular, leading to the flooding of the market with cheap models under $300. This is not necessarily a bad thing however, as some of these less expensive guitars actually play fairly well and sound acceptable.
Okay so the pictures of the guy in white sneakers are super dumb- but the book IS very helpful for a beginner; It comes with small stickers to place underneath the strings to practice fingering per different color stickers numbered 1-5 indicating 1st, second, third… fingering- you get the idea; I wrote on the stickers the letter of each note so I wouldn’t have to remember which colors indicated which notes; and the stickers come off clean with no residue; this is just an added bonus- b/c I initially bought this book over others- b/c it shows pictures of a players’ hand with fingers on the correct frets along with the actual chart; Personally, it is much easier for me to look at a picture of someone playing the note rather than a chart with dots.And as I said the stickers make it a breeze- I don’t have to look down every time I want to play a note to see if my fingers are in the right place. Also the book comes with a pic and a full length poster labeled “notes and scales” to refer to for all of the notes.I haven’t really read through the book- I’m a scimmer anyway- and the first chapter is all about positioning and tuning- which I already know; But if you are a visual learner- and have had trouble in the past- get this book to start with; It’s definitely learn at your own pace- and doesn’t remind me of a boring text book- other authors should be as innovative;
Cheap models are usually modest when it comes to looks, and they won’t sound as “thick” as a pricier model due to cheaper woods and less powerful pickups, but some of them are good choices for beginning and even novice players. Second hand electric guitars are everywhere, and well worth having a look at. You most likely can name at least ten people you know who have, at one point or another, played guitar. Whether they give up after a month or go on to play for the rest of their lives, they will likely be involved in selling a guitar. Seasoned players are constantly searching for their “perfect guitar” and will often sell a perfectly good used guitar in order to fund their next endeavor. Due to this phenomenon, used electric guitar cost can be very low in comparison to their quality. Finding a decent used beginners guitar for under $100 is not unheard of, thanks to the popularity of the instrument and the huge number of used guitars available. Regardless of your situation, it is worth taking the time to examine any used guitar to ensure the value of your investment. If you don’t know what to look for, have someone more experienced do it for you.
The black (or red or any other color) dots on the diagram tell you which frets and strings to place your fingers on. The numbers inside the dots indicate which fingers to use on each of the frets. They correspond to the four fingers of the fretting hand.
Many experiments at electrically amplifying the vibrations of a string instrument were made dating back to the early part of the 20th century. Patents from the 1910s show telephone transmitters were adapted and placed inside violins and banjos to amplify the sound. Hobbyists in the 1920s used carbon button microphones attached to the bridge; however, these detected vibration from the bridge on top of the instrument, resulting in a weak signal.[2] With numerous people experimenting with electrical instruments in the 1920s and early 1930s, there are many claimants to have been the first to invent an electric guitar.
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the “stereo” effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1/4-inch plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
This entire list gets canned just for the omission of one the greats if not the greatest of all-time.. Duane Allman. One of the few I agree with RS about. Jimi Hendricks? Great…MAYBE. Very good? Probably. Top ten? Not on this panet.
The guitarist may employ any of several methods for sounding the guitar, including finger picking, depending on the type of strings used (either nylon or steel), and including strumming with the fingers, or a guitar pick made of bone, horn, plastic, metal, felt, leather, or paper, and melodic flatpicking and finger-picking.
With similar specs and style to the 1952 original – but without the $10,000 price tag – this LP-100 from Epiphone demands attention. As highlighted in our full review, with a classic Les Paul shape, the body is crafted from solid mahogany with a maple top, and features a bolt-on mahogany neck, with rosewood fingerboard, and 22 medium-jumbo frets. The guitar has solid hardware, including a LockTone tune-o-matic bridge and StopBar tailpiece, and 14:1 die-cast machine heads. Good looks and hardware aside, this electric guitar sounds fantastic. This is thanks to the two humbuckers – a 700T at the bridge and 650R at the neck – which offer full, warm tones that adapt to the majority of styles. Perfect for a beginner, although by no means an entry-level guitar.
Eric Johnson is one of the most respected guitar virtuosos in the world. He has a fast, slick style and a brilliant tone. In the late eighties and nineties, Johnson took blues and jazz influences and catapulted them into the next world. And not many guitarists can top ‘Cliffs of Dover’. – Floods

The “learn guitar books” (both acoustic and electric) are here to stay, since thousands of guitar lesson books are being sold everyday, so I thought I would buy, read and compare a couple of these books and see how they perform.
31 Billie Joe Armstrong Billie Joe Armstrong is an American musician, singer, songwriter and actor who is best known as the lead vocalist, primary songwriter, and guitarist of the punk rock band Green Day, which he co-founded with Mike Dirnt.
Guthrie Govan’s Creative Guitar is the end all be all for learning guitar. Buy it and you will gain an amazing insight into playing and philosophy behind it. It’s honestly great for everyone, from beginners to experts. Get it my friend.
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