electric guitar fingerboard | electric guitar history

The grid of six vertical and five horizontal lines represents the guitar fretboard. If you’re having trouble understanding the basic layout of the image above, hold your guitar in front of you so that the strings are facing you and the headstock is pointing up. The image of the chord chart represents this same view of your guitar, with strings running vertically and frets horizontally.
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When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
Beginner’s Guide to Electric Guitar is all you need to start playing electric guitar. With an easy-to-understand and down-to-earth tone, this book gets to the important stuff first and doesn’t bog you down with all the details. Learn all about the different types of electric guitars, amplifiers, and effects, and learn how to play like Led Zeppelin, The White Stripes, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Green Day, Metallica, Nirvana, Rage Against the Machine, Jimi Hendrix, AC/DC, Alice in Chains, and more. To keep things simple, the music examples are written in TAB only and are designed to get you playing quickly—from riffs on a single string to power chords, pentatonic scales, and tunes in drop-D tuning. The accompanying CD features a full band to play along with.
Semi-acoustic guitars have a hollow body (similar in depth to a solid-body guitar) and electronic pickups mounted on the body. They work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Whereas chambered guitars are made, like solid-body guitars, from a single block of wood, semi-acoustic and full-hollowbody guitars bodies are made from thin sheets of wood. They do not provide enough acoustic volume for live performance, but they can be used unplugged for quiet practice. Semi-acoustics are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive, or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, sixties pop, and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes. These can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B. B. King’s famous Lucille. Feedback can also be reduced by making them with a solid block in the middle of the soundbox.
The fourth type of system employs string-through body anchoring. The strings pass over the bridge saddles, then through holes through the top of the guitar body to the back. The strings are typically anchored in place at the back of the guitar by metal ferrules. Many believe this design improves a guitar’s sustain and timbre. A few examples of string-through body guitars are the Fender Telecaster Thinline, the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, the B.C. Rich IT Warlock and Mockingbird, and the Schecter Omen 6 and 7 series.
Do you have some recommendations for a supplemental book of beginner guitar songs? I have learned 3 chords via Jamplay, but they don’t have sheet music with words in their supplemental materials. Also, I have played the flute for 45 years, so am not new to music. 🙂

A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the “stereo” effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1/4-inch plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
Until the 1950s, the acoustic, nylon-stringed classical guitar was the only type of guitar favored by classical, or art music composers. In the 1950s a few contemporary classical composers began to use the electric guitar in their compositions. Examples of such works include Luciano Berio’s Nones (1954) Karlheinz Stockhausen’s Gruppen (1955–57); Donald Erb’s String Trio (1966), Morton Feldman’s The Possibility of a New Work for Electric Guitar (1966); George Crumb’s Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death (1968); Hans Werner Henze’s Versuch über Schweine (1968); Francis Thorne’s Sonar Plexus (1968) and Liebesrock (1968–69), Michael Tippett’s The Knot Garden (1965–70); Leonard Bernstein’s MASS (1971) and Slava! (1977); Louis Andriessen’s De Staat (1972–76); Helmut Lachenmann’s Fassade, für grosses Orchester (1973, rev. 1987), Valery Gavrilin Anyuta (1982), Steve Reich’s Electric Counterpoint (1987), Arvo Pärt’s Miserere (1989/92), György Kurtág’s Grabstein für Stephan (1989), and countless works composed for the quintet of Ástor Piazzolla. Alfred Schnittke also used electric guitar in several works, like the “Requiem”, “Concerto Grosso N°2” and “Symphony N°1”.
You’re right, guitar playing is not about competition. I made the list for fun, to inspire people to listen to great guitar players. And for people to comment to the list and add their personal favorites.
The guitar player who makes his guitar sound anything but a guitar. Helicopter rudders, disc scratching, and his use of the kill switch for staccato like guitar riffs has made him probably the most innovative guitar player of our time. He is a guitarist who can take feedback, and ground hum from his own body into coherent music. Be it Rage Against The Machine, or Audioslave you can always see Morello’s signature licks shining through.
Avoid the thin acoustics that look like electrics. They usually don’t sound good either acoustically or plugged in. This includes Fender’s ‘Telecoustic’ (I otherwise recommend Fender). I’m not really a big fan of any guitars made of anything other than wood either—none of that carbon stuff—just keep it simple.
Ultimately your style and musical tastes will define the best kind of affordable guitar to go for. For example, if classic rock n’ roll is your thing, a Squier Telecaster will definitely suit you, whereas if metal is your passion, a Warlock from B.C. Rich will be worth checking out.
A strong guide for those learning their way around an acoustic guitar, this book will teach you to play popular songs like “Angie,” “Barely Breathing,” “Behind Blue Eyes,” “Building a Mystery,” “Change the World,” “Dust in the Wind,” “Fast Car,” “Here Comes the Sun,” “Jack and Diane,” “Landslide,” “Leaving on a Jet Plane,” “Maggie May,” “More Than Words,” “Name,” “You’ve Got a Friend,” “Yesterday,” and others.
Playing the guitar well is not about strength but about control. As you watch any professional musician you will notice how they appear to effortlessly finesse their instrument. The easiest guitar to play is the one you are truly interested in.
Cheap models are usually modest when it comes to looks, and they won’t sound as “thick” as a pricier model due to cheaper woods and less powerful pickups, but some of them are good choices for beginning and even novice players. Second hand electric guitars are everywhere, and well worth having a look at. You most likely can name at least ten people you know who have, at one point or another, played guitar. Whether they give up after a month or go on to play for the rest of their lives, they will likely be involved in selling a guitar. Seasoned players are constantly searching for their “perfect guitar” and will often sell a perfectly good used guitar in order to fund their next endeavor. Due to this phenomenon, used electric guitar cost can be very low in comparison to their quality. Finding a decent used beginners guitar for under $100 is not unheard of, thanks to the popularity of the instrument and the huge number of used guitars available. Regardless of your situation, it is worth taking the time to examine any used guitar to ensure the value of your investment. If you don’t know what to look for, have someone more experienced do it for you.
I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
A case protects your guitar from excessive humidity, dryness or temperature changes, as well as scratching. Padded fabric gig bags start around $15-$90 for basic bags and run $100-$300 or more for high-quality models. Hardshell cases start around $50-$100, average $100-300 and can run $300-$400 or more. Padded leather bags cost $300-$500 or more.
What the hell? Jimmy Hendrix #1? Above Les Paul, above Buddy Guy who Hendrix worshiped. And what the hell with Angus Young above Mark Knopfler, really? Chet Atkins is way to far down the list and you left Roy Clark off the list completely, unbelievable. Wait, you left off Jose Feliciano and Carlos Montoya too? And the fact that you have that low talent bum Slash listed above anyone is beyond unforgivable. I cannot even write straight, I am in such amazing dismay about the patheticness of this list. Frankly almost all the jazz guitarists can outplay the rock guitarists. Jim Hall, Joe Pass, all better than Slash could be in his wettest dream. Where is John Lee Hooker? His sound was completely unique among blues guitarists. Sorry to take this a little too seriously, but as a guitarist of 30 years and a guitar aficionado I am in shock at the naivety of this list.
While it’s true you don’t need to read music to play guitar, you do want to learn to read chord charts. A chord chart is a visual representation of a guitar chord. Chord charts are a little like music-by-numbers—they tell you which finger goes where and on what string, so in case you come up against a chord you don’t know, you’ll be able to play it.
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