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One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul. Gibson did not present their Gibson Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public, as they did not believe the solid-body style would catch on. Another early solid-body Spanish style guitar, resembling what would become Gibson’s Les Paul guitar a decade later, was developed in 1941 by O.W. Appleton, of Nogales, Arizona.[25] Appleton made contact with both Gibson and Fender but was unable to sell the idea behind his “App” guitar to either company.[26] In 1946, Merle Travis commissioned steel guitar builder Paul Bigsby to build him a solid-body Spanish-style electric.[27] Bigsby delivered the guitar in 1948. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender Esquire and Fender Broadcaster (later to become the Fender Telecaster), first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster.[28] Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and more comfortable ergonomics than other models.
Some “hybrid” electric guitars are equipped with additional microphone, piezoelectric, optical, or other types of transducers to approximate an acoustic instrument tone and broaden the sonic palette of the instrument.
As a piano teacher, there’s is naturally going to be some bias here. But after so many years working at Elite Music Academy, I’ve been asked hundreds of times about piano vs guitar lessons for a beginner. In short, I believe the piano is easier to start with especially for young kids and adults with little time or patience. Aside from that, there are many pros and cons to learning each instrument first, and it boils down to which sounds the most appealing how hard the student is willing to practice.
There are two main types of pickup you’ll find on a guitar suitable for beginners: a single-coil pickup and a humbucker pickup. Without bogging you down in the details of how they work, the single-coil is the classic original pickup, which typically offers a bright and sparkly sound. As they cut through the mix, single-coils are excellent pickups for lead players. Then comes the faithful humbucker, which – as the name suggests – ‘bucks’ the hum, meaning less background noise. Humbuckers produce full, meaty sounds found across the world of rock and metal, and are great for lead and rhythm guitar. However you can still play fast punk rock powerchords with a single-coil, just like you can play an upbeat country number with a humbucker! You’ll usually find two or three pickups on a guitar, although some models will offer just one. Guitars with two or more pickups will come fitted with a pickup selector switch to quickly change between them.
This is the definitive source for all collectors of vintage American fretted instruments. In fact, the Gibson Customer Service department frequently turns to Gruhn’s Guide when faced with questions about a guitar’s authenticity or background.
Reading through the Guitar for Dummies book, it is apparent that unlike the Teach Yourself to Play Guitar book above, this one is not meant solely for beginners. It has lots of info and theory, that would be useful for the intermediate level guitarist. Beyond teaching the basics, this book goes into the particulars of different genres as well.
Finally, the sound. The single most important factor in choosing a guitar is the sound which it will help you achieve. It’s here where things can start getting complicated. You’ll learn over time that while certain guitars may look the part, and may fit the budget, they simply won’t cut it for the style of music you’re trying to play. Over the course of this guide we’ll refer back to a guitar’s ‘tone’ – this is the term used by guitarists to describe the overall sound their guitar puts out. Some tones are better suited to certain types of music, while other tones can only be achieved using certain combinations of gear. Either way, it helps to have an idea of the kind of sound you’re trying to achieve as this will have the most critical impact on the guitars which will suit you and your playing best.
In the 1960s, the tonal palette of the electric guitar was further modified by introducing effect units in its signal path, before the guitar amp, of which one of the earliest units was the fuzz pedal. Effects units come in several formats, the most common of which are the stompbox “pedal” and the rackmount unit. A stomp box (or pedal) is a small metal or plastic box containing the circuitry, which is placed on the floor in front of the musician and connected in line with the patch cord connected to the instrument. The box is typically controlled by one or more foot-pedal on-off switches and it typically contains only one or two effects. Pedals are smaller than rackmount effects and usually less expensive. “Guitar pedalboards” are used by musicians who use multiple stomp-boxes; these may be a DIY project made with plywood or a commercial stock or custom-made pedalboard.
The best, if you look at it objectivley. Hendrix came along in the sixties and revolutionised the instrument like no other. A great live improviser, he also wrote amazing songs, and has inspired just about anyone who has picked up a guitar since. – Floods
The most technical electric guitarist…ever. Steve Vai may not be as flash as the likes of John Petrucci and Paul Gilbert, but when he does go flat-out, he’s untouchable. Vai has mastered every technique imaginable, but still has soul. ‘Passion and Warfare’ and ‘The Ultra Zone’ are must haves. – Floods
If you do want an amplifier, there is a vast array of models available with all kinds of fancy stuff built in, effects, digital modelling, even backing tracks! It really depends on your budget. It’s very likely that a new amplifier will be your first major purchase if you stick with it (they make a bigger difference to your sound than the guitar does, believe it or not!) so my advice is to start small and simple, learn a bit, see where it is taking you and you will have a better idea of what to spend your hard-earned cash on. There’s more about amps in lesson BC-103.
Electric guitars are very popular, leading to the flooding of the market with cheap models under $300. This is not necessarily a bad thing however, as some of these less expensive guitars actually play fairly well and sound acceptable.
This will be interesting, I’ve never met anyone who transferred from the violin to the guitar. I would imagine it makes things easier, since that’s a stringed instrument as well, albeit very different. I played trumpet before guitar, but that wasn’t much help to me obviously 🙂
With similar specs and style to the 1952 original – but without the $10,000 price tag – this LP-100 from Epiphone demands attention. As highlighted in our full review, with a classic Les Paul shape, the body is crafted from solid mahogany with a maple top, and features a bolt-on mahogany neck, with rosewood fingerboard, and 22 medium-jumbo frets. The guitar has solid hardware, including a LockTone tune-o-matic bridge and StopBar tailpiece, and 14:1 die-cast machine heads. Good looks and hardware aside, this electric guitar sounds fantastic. This is thanks to the two humbuckers – a 700T at the bridge and 650R at the neck – which offer full, warm tones that adapt to the majority of styles. Perfect for a beginner, although by no means an entry-level guitar.
So where do you start in a section as massive as this one? From acoustic to electric, nylon to steel stringed, hollow body to solid body, all styles are represented here, so having a good idea of what you’re looking for will definitely help. The best place to start is usually with the brand, as each one has a reputation for something different, allowing you to narrow things down from there. For example, you’ll instantly recognize names like Fender, Gibson and Ibanez as trailblazers of the electric guitar, while others like Martin, Taylor, and Breedlove are more famous for the unparalleled quality of their acoustic instruments. After that, you’ll want to look at things like body type, tonewood, strings, size, orientation and performance level. Once you have a general idea about each of these, your decision gets that much easier. Just remember, it all comes down to personal preference, so as long as you’re happy with the guitar you choose you can’t go wrong. The guitar is a special instrument, with a different meaning to every player. Whether you’re taking your first steps into the world of music or you’re a professional rocking out in front of sold out stadiums all over the planet, strumming, plucking and picking on a guitar is a way to express yourself that can’t be duplicated with anything else. So pick up a guitar here and start playing… you’ll be glad you did.
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The frets are those thin metal bars running down the neck, which act as note separators, allowing you to play individual notes and chords. Most guitars will feature 22 frets, although those more rock and metal-inclined will sometimes offer 24, allowing you to reach higher notes. As a beginner it shouldn’t really bother you whether you have 21, 22, or 24 frets. It’s only as you grow into the instrument you’ll find what works best for you.
He has surely got to be one of the greatest electric guitar players ever. He has everything. Some people just think he is fast, but it is his precision and technique. I have gotta be honest, Hendrix should be at the top.
Notice how we’ve said ‘affordable’ instead of ‘cheap’? That’s because cheap guitars have connotations of being… well, pieces of junk. Cheap can mean ‘barely capable of producing a sound’, ‘plasticky components’ and ‘hardware that threatens to break at any given moment’. Not what anyone needs.
Generally speaking, you can apply the first ‘filter’ to your search by segmenting things according to one of three main variables; price, look and sound. The price of the guitar is perhaps the most limiting factor; we’re sure everyone would plump for a top of the range Gibson or Fender but, as you’ll find out, the flagship guitars from these guys run into four figures. You could quite easily pick up a decent second hand car for the same price as a Gibson Les Paul so, if you’re at the start of your playing career, it may be wiser to set your sights a bit lower. Don’t forget your dreams though; every guitarist has what they’d call a ‘perfect’ guitar, the one which they’d appropriate in the event of a significant lottery win. Never forget that guitar, and use the thought of it to drive you on through those first few years learning monotonous scales and chords. Trust us, it’s worth it. The feeling you get when you finally purchase your long-time dream guitar, and have the playing chops to match, is really something else.

well.. first.. i’am bassist, and also an audio engineer for my band. and my my guitarist is struggling to find an affordable Electric Guitar, so.. i showed her this web. and she ended up buying the fender modern player tele. and it sounds beautiful!! i was amazed by the tone of this guitar. well.. Many Thanks, mate!!!
In recent decades, the most “notable classical and cross genre” guitarist was Paco de Lucía, one of the first flamenco guitarists to have successfully crossed over into other genres of music such as classical and jazz. Richard Chapman and Eric Clapton, authors of Guitar: Music, History, Players, describe de Lucía as a “titanic figure in the world of flamenco guitar”,[13] and Dennis Koster, author of Guitar Atlas, Flamenco, has referred to de Lucía as “one of history’s greatest guitarists.”.[14][15]
28 Angus Young Angus McKinnon Young is an Australian guitarist of Scottish origin, best known as the co-founder, lead guitarist, songwriter and sole constant member of the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. When performing live he does his own version of Chuck Berry’s “duck walk” and has also spun on his side while …read more.
As musicians, we have a staggering amount of information available to us that can help us hone our craft. The hard part is deciding which resources are valuable and which resources aren’t. We’ve all ordered a book off of Amazon that we thought was going to take our playing to the next level only to find out that we could have gotten just as much out of a five minute Google search. Well, not all books are created equal, and you’ve probably not been looking at the right ones.
New to this chart is Squier’s affordable Affinity Jazzmaster, which marries the classic Jazzmaster/Jaguar body shape with superb playability and stripped-down electronics to deliver an ideal guitar for beginners. Sporting the ultra-accessible body shape (made of solid alder), the highlight is the 22-fret C-shaped maple neck which is a real joy to play. It looks great, with that vintage-inspired ’68 headstock, and sounds pretty good too – a little heavier than expected, thanks to the surprisingly hot humbuckers. The traditional switching system is gone, leaving behind simple beginner-friendly controls – master volume, tone and a three-way switch. It’s a breath of fresh air for beginners wanting something different – as we mention in the complete Squier Affinity Jazzmaster review [INSERT LINK to Full Review].
Super useful article. I read about every model and in the end chose the Epiphone Les Paul. Got the vintage sunburst color. From Amazon with a 10w practice amp, electronic tuner and soft sided case the whole kit only came to $209 and had free shipping.
An excerpt: “Although presumably the easiest of guitar techniques, it’s amazing how many guitarists neglect basic chord strumming. A strong command of strumming is probably the most important skill you can develop in acoustic guitar playing, especially if you intend to accompany yourself or someone else singing.”
My favourite adage applies: buy cheap, buy twice. I rate the Yamaha Pacifica guitars (which start around £200/$350). They have a thin neck (which is good for rock) and consistently excellent build quality. I don’t think there is much of a question about the quality of these guitars and most of the other teachers I respect recommend them as well. There are many cheaper guitars out there but for the few pounds you will save you are much better off going for a Pacifica in my humble opinion. I never owned one myself (and I don’t have any kind of deal going with them at all), but have played many that students bought in over the years, which is why I recommend them to you!
The sound of a guitar can not only be adapted by electronic sound effects but is also heavily affected by various new techniques developed or becoming possible in combination with electric amplification. This is called extended technique.
On a list highlighting affordable, quality, and beginner-friendly guitars it would be a sin to exclude an Ibanez. And the RG450DX more than earns its place – it’s sensational in both sound, style and feel. With the classic RG double-cutaway body shape, it’s made from solid basswood with a sleek and speedy Wizard III maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard, and a full 24 jumbo frets for excellent soloing capabilities. The RG450DX – reviewed in full here – has a trio of Quantum pickups, with two humbuckers and a single-coil in the middle, giving this axe mega tone, and plenty of rock aggression. The Edge-Zero II and locking nut finishes it off nicely. A great value classic with a premium feel.
The strings fitted to the guitar also have an influence on tone. Rock musicians often[vague] prefer the lightest gauge of roundwound string, which is easier to bend, while jazz musicians go for heavier, flatwound strings, which have a rich, dark sound. Steel, nickel, and cobalt are common string materials, and each gives a slightly different tone color. Recent guitar designs may incorporate much more complex circuitry than described above; see Digital and synthesizer guitars, below.
Admit it. You’ve slow danced to Stairway To Heaven before. Page’s playing have influenced so many guitar players of today, and Led Zeppelin revolutionized Rock and Roll blending acoustic guitars, banjos, and mandolins while still staying with the same gritty rock image. His guitar riffs are forever etched into Rock and Roll’s hall of fame. How influential was he? Step into a guitar store, and you’ll see. Thousands of 12 year old kids across the globe are playing the intro to Stairway. Now that’s how you know you’ve made it.
You may find guitar chords represented a number of ways across the internet. Here at beginner electric guitar we use a very simple method to represent them diagramatically which you should be able to interpret quite easily. This way is very common and is the standard way of representing chords in music books and music theory.
Carter, (now of Gruhn Guitars) a writer of the first degree, chronicles Gibson’s first hundred years, from its modest beginnings in Kalamazoo, Michigan, to its changes of ownership and eventual move to Nashville, Tennessee. Mostly though, this is the story of a brand of guitars that changed the world.
The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.
Some of the other that you can check is Amaj, Cmaj, Dmaj, Emaj, Cmaj9 and Gmaj. Those are the major chords that you can start to grip on. For the minor chords are the following: Ami, which is similar to Emaj wherein you will see in a chord chart that Ami really looks like Emaj, and the Emi. Those are the only two minor chords that you need to now right now because when we get to barre chords where you will learn later on after getting on the scales and riffs. Then you will learn all the minor chords across the entire guitar lesson.
No! There’s no reason advanced players couldn’t enjoy using them either – especially with the performance that some of them offer. As they are so affordable, I wouldn’t bet against experienced players fancying a couple to add to their collections.
Guitarists use power chords — built on the lowest notes of a regular open-position or barre chord — in rock music to create a low sound. Power chords are easier to play than are their full-version counterparts and don’t contain a major or minor quality to them, so they can stand in for either type of chord. Plus, they’re loads of fun to play!
Nice list Klaus, but probably not really possible to do(so). So many names are missing. And K. Richards between Cooder and Frusciante?!?! Sorry, but not in my observable universe. And,(i´m serious as cancer, Klaus), you are not allowed to forget about Neil Schon. I have seen this small man live in 2008, and I can tell you Klaus, you cannot, I repeat: CAN!NOT!….. ignore this guitar player! Never ever. No way. Even for an unperfect list, even if you really do not like the music of Journey, this is an “unforgivable” mistake. But do not fret, Klaus; nobody´s perfect……;)
Compared to an acoustic guitar, which has a hollow body, electric guitars make much less audible sound when their strings are plucked, so electric guitars are normally plugged into a guitar amplifier and speaker. When an electric guitar is played, string movement produces a signal by generating (i.e., inducing) a small electric current in the magnetic pickups, which are magnets wound with coils of very fine wire. The signal passes through the tone and volume circuits to the output jack, and through a cable to an amplifier.[17] The current induced is proportional to such factors as string density and the amount of movement over the pickups.
Where there is more than one pickup, a pickup selector switch is usually present to select or combine the outputs of two or more pickups, so that two-pickup guitars have three-way switches, and three-pickup guitars have five-way switches (a Gibson Les Paul three-pickup Black Beauty has a three-position toggle switch that configures bridge, bridge and middle [switch in middle position] and neck pickups). Further circuitry sometimes combines pickups in different ways. For instance, phase switching places one pickup out of phase with the other(s), leading to a “honky”,[when defined as?] “nasal”,[when defined as?] or “funky”[when defined as?] sound. Individual pickups can also have their timbre altered by switches, typically coil tap switches that effectively short-circuit some of a dual-coil pickup’s windings[vague] to produce a tone similar to a single-coil pickup (usually done with push-pull volume knobs).
OK, once you have found your inner rock god and have had a good thrash, it’s time to look at some lovely new chords that you can use to embellish you regular chord playing in BC-173 • A Sus2/4 and D Sus2/4 Chords, Esus4
The electric guitar has since evolved into a stringed musical instrument that is capable of a multitude of sounds and styles, and served as a major component in the development of rock ‘n’ roll and many other genres of music.
While music is an art form in itself, playing an instrument such as the guitar has long been a popular subject for painters. One of the more famous examples is the painting Degas’s Father Listening to Lorenzo Pagans Playing the Guitar by Edgar Degas, which was painted sometime between 1869–72 and is currently owned by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.[1]
The look of a guitar is, rightly or wrongly, a significant factor in most players’ buying decisions. Some will buy because a particular style of guitar fits in with their image or choice of genre, while others will buy simply because they like the exact hue of red in the sunburst. Either way, there’s no shame in listing a guitar’s appearance as a significant motivator in your purchasing journey. After all, you’ve got to want to play it so it helps if the thing is drop dead gorgeous.
27 Kirk Hammett Kirk Lee Hammett is the lead guitarist and songwriter for the heavy metal band Metallica and has been a member of the band since 1983. Before joining Metallica he formed and named the band Exodus.
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